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BIENNIAL REPORT 

1 JULY, 1974 -30 JUNE, 1976 



1636 




1976 



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MASSACHUSETTS 
IATIONAL GUARD 




"WHERE IT ALL BEGAN" 



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In reply refer to 
MAAR-AG 



The commonwealth of Massachusetts 

MILITARY DIVISION 

THE ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE 

905 COMMONWEALTH AVENUE. BOSTON. MASS. 02213 



31 January 1977 



Honorable Michael S. Dukakis 

Governor 

State House 

Boston, Massachusetts 02133 



Dear Governor Dukakis: 

Enclosed is the Annual Report of the Military Division, Coraraonwea lth 
of Massachusetts; recounting activities and accomplishments during the 
period 1 July 1974 to 31 December 1976. 



Respectfully, 



1 Inc 
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HW^RTAl 



VAHAlTVARTANIi 

MAJOR GENERAL, MASS ARNG 

The Adjutant General 



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MichaelS. Dukakis 
Governor 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 



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Major General Vahan Vartanian 
The Adjutant General 
Massachusetts 



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THE 
ADJUTANT GENERAL'S 
SUMMARY 

The Massachusetts National Guard continues to be a factor of ever in- 
creasing importance in the economy of the Commonwealth. During the fiscal 
years covered by this report over $99 million of Federal Funds was allotted 
to the Massachusetts National Guard and was disbursed within the Commonwealth 
in the form of pay and allowances for approximately 13,000 military members 
of our Guard, 1,500 Federal civilian employees and an additional 25 Federal 
service contract employees, all who are residents of Massachusetts. Pay in- 
creases during 75 & 76 amounted to five percent each year for all Guardsmen 
and Federal Technicians and will further increase our allotment of Federal 
funds in the new fiscal year thereby providing an even greater impact on the 
State economy. 

A review of our accomplishments during this period indicates that much 
progress has been made by way of attaining the goals we had established. Some 
of the more significant results are indicated by the following facts: 

Our 685th Military Police Battalion was ordered to two weeks State 

Active Duty to assist in maintaining order for Phase II of the Boston Desegrega- 
tion Busing Program and received the highest accolades from the Boston Police 
Department . 

Members of the 685th MP Bn, 26th MP Co, Members of State Headquarters 

and the 1st Bde, 26th Infantry Division, 211th FA, and 26th Aviation Bn, all 
participated in the arrival of the "Tall Ships" and the arrival of Her Majesty, 
Queen Elizabeth visit to Boston. 

During Fiscal year 1975, the 102d Fighter Interceptor Group and some 

of its members won the 21st Aerospace Division's Missile Nuclear Safety Award 
for calendar year 1974. 

During FY76, the 104th Tactical Fighter Group participated in JCS Ex- 
ercise "Jack Frost 76", staged from Elmersdorf Air Force Base, Alaska. The 
F-100 aircraft flew to the exercise site from Barnes Base, with mid-air re- 
fueling provided by Air Force and Air National Guard tanker aircraft. As a 
result of outstanding performance the Group was awarded a Special Certificate 
of Achievement. 



The 101st Tactical Control Squadron was awarded the U.S. Readiness 

Command Joint Readiness Certificate for its accomplishment during Exercise 
Brave Shield XII at Mc Gregor, Texas. 

We have made great strides in other areas, such as recruitment of minority 
group personnel, and have more than doubled minority membership in Guard units. 
At the present time minority groups comprise 12.3% of total membership in the 
Massachusetts National Guard. This is significant since minority groups re- 
present only approximately 5.5% of total population. 



As oi 1974 the Guard had a total of 43 females, as of 31 June 1976 
the Guard has a total of 272 female personnel. Emphasis will continue on re- 
cruiting minority group personnel. 

Personnel of the 215th Array Band developed a music learning program for 
youngsters in the southeastern part of Massachusetts. In addition to teaching 
youths how to play musical instruments, classes were given on arranging, etc.. 
The youths traveled throughout the State giving concerts. 

Massachusetts Military Academy continues in its progress in turning out 
young officers. Class #44 had an initial enrollment of 77, including 5 USAR 
students and the first 2 female officer candidates in the History of the 
Academy. It is anticipated all cadets will be graduated and commissioned in 
July 1977. 

Camp Edwards was taken over by the Army National Guard in February 1975. 
Since that time, it has provided training support to the Army National Guard 
of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut and New Hampshire; to the Regular 
Army Special Forces from Fort Devens; to the Seabees, to the Marine Corps Re- 
serve and the Air Guard of Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, Alabama and 
Pennsylvania. In FY 77 both MIT and Raytheon conducted some DOD test using 
the facilities at Camp Edwards. 

Despite many problems during the period, we continue to Recruit. Re- 
cently in January 1977 Operation Minuteman was conducted and was very 
successful bringing aboard a total of 407 enlistments for the month. The 
results attained in uiis period represent a great deal of extra time and dili- 
gent effort on the part of personnel. I hope the results have been as rewarding 
to them as they have been gratifying to me. Our personnel have been outstanding 
in assistance to their fellow citizens of the Commonwealth. in time of emergency, 
and have responded continually to charitable works, Blood banks and Community 
Projects. I am very proud of the skill and dedication shown by our Guardsmen 
in every activity and I know the New Year will produce further important 
accomplishments . 



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INDEX 



Page 

Mission and Organization 1 

Army National Guard 4 

Air National Guard 8 

Staff Organization, Military Division 18 

Alternate Headquarters 19 

Technician Personnel Office 20 

Military Personnel Division 26 

Directorate, Plans, Security and Training 32 

Plans, Operations and Military Support Branch 35 

Army Aviation 47 

Training and Readiness Branch 51 

Massachusetts Military Academy 55 

Marksmanship Training 60 

Unit Awards Program 63 

Camp Edwards 64 

Administration and Finance Division 67 

Supply and Services Division, US Property & Fiscal Office 68 

Program Development Office 77 

Public Affairs Division 78 

Selective Service 79 

Massachusetts State Guard 80 

Inspector General 83 

Safety Office 84 

Community Action 85 

State Maintenance Office 90 



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MISSION 

For over three centuries a "soldier in war, a civilian in peace," the 
National Guard is rooted in the concept of the privilege and responsibility 
of our able-bodied citizens to be ready at all times to bear arms for the 
common defense. The Congress is empowered to "provide for organization, 
arming and disciplining the militia." National military policy has served 
to enhance the availability and improve the readiness of the National Guard 
as a Federal Reserve Force. 

The Federal mission as stated in Section 102, Title 32, United States 
Code is quoted: 

"In accordance with the traditional military policy of the United States, 
it is essential that the strength and organization of the Army National Guard 
and the Air National Guard as an integral part of the first line defenses of 
the United States be maintained and assured at all times. Whenever Congress 
determines that more units and organizations are needed for the national 
security than are in the regular components of the ground and air forces, 
the Army National Guard and the Air National Guard of the United States, or 
such parts of them as are necessary for a balanced force, shall be ordered 
to active Federal duty and retained as long as so needed," 

The State mission is to provide units so organized, trained and equipped 
that under competent orders of proper authorities they will provide for pro- 
tection of life and property and preserve peace, order and public safety. 

The authority for and conditions warranting State active duty are 
specified in Chapter 33, General Laws of Massachusetts. 

HERITAGE 

The origins of the Massachusetts National Guard lie deep in the history 
of Colonial America, with its civilian-soldier role of today and the nature 
of its membership still closely paralleling those of the pre-Revolutionary 
militia. It remains a hometown organization, drawing its manpower and support 
from the community in which it is organized. 



The first organized militia within the English Colonies was formed in 
1636 when a samll band of settlers in Middlesex formed a unit to protect 
their homes from hostile Indians. Eventually calling themselves the "Old 
North Regiment", this unit fought in the French and Indian Wars, was mobilized 
early in the Revolutionary War and has served in four wars since that time. 
It currently exists as the 1st Battalion, 182d Infantry of the Massachusetts 
Army National Guard. 



Many other Massachusetts Guard units trace their lineage to Colonial 
times, some still proudly parading with the uniforms and relics of their 
militiaman predecessors. Once such unit rich in this Massachusetts lore 
is the First Corps of Cadets, now the 126th Signal Battalion, 

The First Corps traces its origin in 1726 when it was formed under 
the name of the Independent Corps of Cadets to serve as a bodyguard to the 
English Governor of the Province of Massachusetts. Its official charter 
date is some years later in 1741 when Colonial Governor William Shirley 
signed a still-preserved parchment authorizing the Corps to enlist 64 young 
men. 

Though their official loyalty was to the Colonial government, and in 
effect the Crown, many of the cadets found it hard to avoid siding with the 
rising emotions of the patriots. Among them was their commander John Hancock 
who eventually was relieved of command at the order of the new military governor, 
General Thomas Gage. In support of their commander, the cadets all resigned 
effectively disbanding the unit until the Colony was reorganized as a State 
after the Revolution. 

In 1789, when Massachusetts Governor James Bowdoin reconstituted the 
unit naming Hancock an honorary Colonel, a second corps also was organized in 
Salem. This is now the 1st Battalion, 102d Field Artillery, Salem. These 
two units are the only organizations in what today is known as the Massachusetts 
Array National Guard that had had continuous service since the Constitution of 
the United States was ratified. 

The First Corps went on to serve in Valley Forge and in the Battles of 
Monmouth, Quaker Hill, West Point and Springfield, New Jersey. Members of 
the Corps reached Yorktown in 1781 and participated in the surrender of 
Cornwallis on October 19 of that year. The unit's successor, the 126th Signal 
Battalion still is authorized to carry colors from those battles. 

In the following pages, we report on those organizations, their operation 
and their accomplishments for the Massachusetts National Guard during the 
period 1 July 1974 to 30 June 1976. 



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ARMY NATIONAL GUARD - MASSACHUSETTS 



The Army National Guard of Massachusetts consists of division and 
non-divisional elements with a total authorized strength of 12,442 military 
personnel. The organizations, units, their locations and authorized strengths 
are shown below: 



Headquarters Detachment, MassARNG 

65th Public Information Detachment 

215th Army Band 

685th Military Police Battalion 

1058th Transportation Company 

972d Military Police Company 

181st Engineer Combat Support Company 

1059th Medical Detachment (Helicopter) 



HEADQUARTERS 


AUTHORIZED 


STRENGTHS 


LOCATION 


OFF 


WO 


ENL TOTAL 


Boston 


104 


19 


123 246 


Boston 


4 





9 13 


Fall River 





1 


44 45 


Bourne 


14 


1 


274 289 


Hingham 


4 


1 


104 109 


Lexington 


4 





160 164 


Natick 


7 


1 


206 214 


Westover 


4 


10 


36 50 



141 33 



956 



1130 



26th (YANKEE) Infantry Division 

Headquarters & Headquarters Company 

26th Military Police Company 

26th Aviation Battalion 

1st Squadron, 26th Cavalry 

101st Engineer Battalion 

126th Signal Battalion 

HHC, 1st Brigade, 26th Inf Div 

HHC, 3d Brigade, 26th Inf Div 

1st Battalion, 101st Infantry 

1st Battalion, 104th Infantry 

2d Battalion, 104th Infantry 

1st Battalion, 181st Infantry 

1st Battalion, 182d Infantry 

2d Battalion, 181st Infantry (Mech) 

1st Battalion, 110th Armor 

HHB ,26th Infantry Division Artillery 

1st Battalion, 101st Field Artillery 

1st Battalion, 211th Field Artillery 

1st Battalion, 102d Field Artillery 

HHC, Division Support Command 

26th AG Company 

726th Finance Company 

26th Supply & Transportation Battalion 

726th Maintenance Battalion 

114th Medical Battalion 

26th Material Management Center 



Boston 


57 


2 


102 


161 


Boston 


9 





189 


198 


Otis AFB 


23 


21 


146 


190 


Reading 


25 


3 


434 


462 


Reading 


41 


4 


832 


877 


Quincy 


24 


5 


532 


561 


Lexington 


23 


8 


74 


105 


Westover 


23 


8 


74 


105 


Dorchester 


37 


4 


697 


738 


Westf ield 


37 


4 


697 


738 


Chicopee 


37 


4 


697 


738 


Worcester 


37 


4 


697 


738 


Melrose 


37 


4 


697 


738 


Whitinsville 


37 


4 


771 


812 


Worcester 


34 


4 


483 


521 


Rehoboth 


35 


17 


175 


227 


Boston 


37 


5 


419 


461 


New Bedford 


28 


4 


546 


578 


Salem 


37 


5 


419 


461 


Boston 


18 


3 


73 


94 


Boston 


18 


4 


239 


261 


Boston 


8 





82 


90 


Framingham 


16 


2 


277 


295 


Natick 


27 


18 


642 


687 


Boston 


58 


1 


291 


350 


Boston 


15 
778 


12 
150 


99 
10,384 


126 




11,312 



ARMY NATIONAL GUARD 



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26TH (YANKEE) INFANTRY DIVISION 

During this reporting period the Division again made important con- 
tributions to the safety and welfare of many citizens of the Commonwealth. 
On 20 October 1974 the Division again sponsored a march for the benefit of 
"Horizons for Youth". This is an organization that operates a 300 acre 
facility on Lake Massapoag in Sharon for needy, disadvantaged, retarded and 
handicapped teen-agers and young adults. Led by Major General Vahan Vartanian, 
The Adjutant General, and Major General Nicholas J. Del Tor to, the Division 
Commander, volunteer National Guardsmen marched, with each of their solicited 
sponsors paying for every mile they walked. When final returns were made 
months later, officials of the "Horizons for Youth" organization were elated 
by the response and funds raised by the march. Besides participating in the 
march, National Guard personnel assisted in laying out the various march 
routes across the Commonwealth, distributing posters to promote it, circulating 
sponsor cards, hosting registration in the various armories for other marchers 
and sponsors, providing aid stations and manning check points. 

A major event of the year was the Bicentennial Parade in Concord, 19 April 
1975. Over 1200 members of the Division were assigned to this event in several 
capacities, including parade units, crowd control, traffic control, medical 
support, and security measures taken to protect President Ford during his visit 
to the parade and to the town of Lexington. Over 1,000 members were assigned 
to similar type duties in Lexington on the same date. Company C, l-110th Armor, 
was designated Honor Guard for the President of the United States, and was a 
part of his Escort. Additionally, Division units participated in parades in 
numerous other cities and towns throughout the Commonwealth on this day, 
commemorating the 200th anniversary of the birth of our nation. 

On 1 April 1975, the Division underwent a major reorganization, resulting 
in the elimination of some units and consolidation and/or conversion of others. 
Major changes included the activation of a Mechanized Infantry Battalion, 
elimination of the l-220th Infantry and 2-102d Field Artillery, conversion of 
several company size units from one type unit to another, i.e., signal to 
engineer; field artillery to cavalry; engineer to infantry; transportation to 
infantry; etc. . Although this reorganization had a major impact on the readiness 
of the Division, intensive training conducted throughout the year enabled 
the Division to regain its combat potential. 

As in past years, the 26th (YANKEE) Infantry Division was a major parti- 
cipant in the annual Easter Seal Campaign, providing personnel to man 96 
collection points throughout the Commonwealth and 70 celebrity telephones 
during the annual telethon. 

Time and again throughout the period of this report, the YANKEE Division 
was called upon for various civic action assistance missions. Among the many 
projects received, two of the most notable were the Middleton Dump Fire and 
Phase II of the Boston bussing program. 



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On 2 December 1975, the Commissioner of Environmental Quality Engineering 
declared an Air Pollution Incident Emergency resulting from a dump fire 
that had been burning and smoldering since mid-November in Middleton, 
Massachusetts. Subsequently, on 5 December 1975, selected personnel of 
the 101st Engineer Battalion were ordered to State Active Duty to assist 
in extinguishing the fire. The effort was successfully concluded on 
13 February 1976, when these personnel were released from State Active Duty. 
As noted in the Lowell Sun , the men of the 101st Engineer Battalion accomplished 
their mission despite being "faced with everything from charges of unconstitut- 
ionally occupying private land to the problems of a shovel dozer catching 
fire " 



Planning for Phase II bussing began early in March 1975. In order to 
better equip members of the units most likely to be called for duty, in- 
tensive programs of race relations/awareness and civil disturbance operations 
were conducted during annual training at both Fort Drum and Camp Edwards. 
Personnel from the Defense Race Relations Institute and the Massachusetts 
State Police provided assistance in conducting this training. Division units 
ordered to State Active Duty during Phase II were the 26th Military Police 
Company, 1st Battalion, 101st Infantry, and selected personnel from the 
1st Battalion, 181st Infantry, totalling more than 700 Guardpersons , in 
addition to those personnel required from command and control units. The 
period of State Active Duty was two weeks, beginning 7 September and ending 
19 September. The year ended on a quiet note with the 26th (YANKEE) Infantry 
Division preparing for Annual Training 1976. 



685TH MILITARY POLICE BATTALION 



Following is a list of activities and events in which the 685th MP Bn 
participated during CY 1975 and CY 1976: 

March 1975 - The 772d MP Co provided traffic control at the Easter 
Seal Telethon at Channel 56, Boston MA. 

August - September 1975 - Personnel of the battalion provided water 
to stranded motorists enroute to and from Cape Cod. 

September 1975 - The entire battalion was ordered to 2 weeks State 
Active Duty to assist in maintaining order for Phase II of the Boston 
Desegregation Busing Program. 

October 1975 - The 772d MP Co and personnel from HHD 685th. MP Bn 
provided security and traffic control for the visit of Emporer Hirohito 
of Japan to Otis AFB. 

March 1976 - Det 1, 772d MP Co provided traffic control for the 
Easter Seal Telethon at Channel 56, Boston MA. 

July 1976 - The Battalion was called to State Active Duty for 3 days 
to provide crowd and traffic control for the visits of Queen Elizabeth 
and the Tall Ships to the City of Boston. 

October 1976 - Elements of the battalion provided traffic control 
for the dedication of the National Cemetery at Otis AFB. 

October 1976 - The 972d MP Co and personnel from HHD 685th MP Bn 
were ordered to 2 days State Active Duty to provide crowd and traffic 
control for the City of Lowell's Octoberfest Celebration, 



AIR NATIONAL GUARD 

The primary mission of the Massachusetts Air National Guard is to 
provide fully ready units to the United States Air Force for the purpose of 
tactical air support, aerospace defense, communications and electronics, and 
weather observation and reporting. Its units are located at Otis Air Force 
Base on Cape Cod, Barnes Municipal Airport at Westfield, Wellesley Air National 
Guard Station, and Worcester Air National Guard Station. 

OTIS AIR FORCE BASE 

The Air National Guard continues to be the principal operating agent of 
Otis Air Force Base acting as the surrogate for the National Guard Bureau. 
This includes the management supervision of the Aerospace Defense Command base 
support force of over 200 U.S. Civil Service employees in addition to the 
Air Technician complement for direct support of the fighter interceptor 
mission. The units continue to sustain a high degree of readiness including 
armed alert aircraft at the immediate disposal of North American Air Defense 
Command. Aircraft and crews are on alert 24 hours a day 7 days a week. This 
task requires seven (7) primary pilots and 12 maintenance operations airmen 
on duty at all times. During the past Fiscal Year, the unit has had a total 
of 276 battle stations alerts, 64 active air scrambles, and 21 completed in- 
tercepts. In addition, the immediate 21st NORAD Air Division Headquarters at 
Syracuse, New York, conducts frequent aerospace defense exercises requiring 
added aircraft and aircrew obligations. 

In order to accomplish its mission, the Group is manned by 884 military 
personnel, 585 of which are employed as full-time Air Technicians. This is 
in addition to the 200 Department of Air Force personnel in Federal Civil 
Service Employee status providing support of housekeeping and facility maintenance 
requirements. 

Fiscal Year 1975 was a most significant year for the 102d Wing and Group. 
These Cape Cod units passed the Aerospace Defense Command multiple inspections 
in the areas of Operational Readiness, Weapons Security, and General Management 
Effectiveness. In June 1975, the 102d Fighter Interceptor Group attained the 
highest operational readiness status possible under the Joint Chiefs of Staff 
criteria. The rating of C-l is one all units of the Armed Forces strive to 
attain. Since being on full alert, the 102d Delta Dart F-106's have been 
scrambled for a number of reasons, Participation in the Aerospace Defense Command 
Exercise "COMBAT PIKE" at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, provided some 
fourteen (14) primary aircrews with the opportunity to live-fire weapons systems, 
something which cannot be done at home station. 

AWARDS : During Fiscal Year 1975, the 102d Fighter Interceptor Group and some 
of its members won significant awards as follows: 






21st Aerospace Division's Missile Nuclear Safety Award for Calendar Year 



1974. 



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AIR NATIONAL GUARD - MASSACHUSETTS 



The Air National Guard of Massachusetts consist of a wing headquarters, a 
fighter interceptor group, a tactical fighter group and a combat communications m 
group. The organizations, their locations and authorized strengths are shown 1 
below: 



Hq, Mass ANG 

202d Weather Flight (SA) 

567th Air Force Band 
Hq, 102d Fighter Interceptor Wing 

Hq, 102d Fighter Interceptor Group 

101st Fighter Interceptor Sq 

102d Consolidated Aircraft 
Maintenance Sq 

102d Combat Support Sq 

102d Supply Sq 

102d USAF Clinic 

102d Civil Engineering Flight 
101st Weather Flight (F) 
Hq, 104th Tactical Fighter Group 

131st Tactical Fighter Sq 

104th Combat Support Sq 

104th Consolidated Aircraft 
Maintenance Sq 

104th TAC Clinic 

104th Civil Engineering Flight 

104th Mobility Support Flight 

104th Weapons System Security 
Flight 

104th Communications Flight (Spt) 

131st Weather Flight (F) 
Hq 253d Combat Communications Gp 

267th Combat Communications Sq(AFCH)Wellesley 

101st Tactical Control Sq (CRP) 

212th Electronics Installation Sq 



HEADQUARTERS 


AUTHORIZED 


STRENGTHS 


LOCATION 


OFF 


AMN 


TOTAL 


Otis AFB 


16 


14 


30 


Otis AFB 


3 


13 


16 


Otis AFB 


1 


34 


35 


Otis AFB 


23 


31 


54 


Otis AFB 


13 


13 


26 


Otis AFB 


26 


19 


45 


Otis AFB 


11 


347 


358 


Otis AFB 


19 


220 


239 


Otis AFB 


6 


69 


75 


Otis AFB 


12 


31 


43 


Otis AFB 


4 


81 


85 


Otis AFB 


4 


9 


13 


Westf ield 


18 


21 


39 


Westf ield 


27 


13 


40 


Westfield 


20 


203 


223 


Westf ield 


6 


247 


253 


Westfield 


9 


17 


26 


Westfield 


4 


88 


92 


Westfield 


2 


54 


56 


Westfield 


1 


36 


37 


Westfield 


2 


27 


29 


Westfield 


4 


9 


13 


Wellesley 


18 


35 


53 


Wellesley 


13 


281 


294 


Worcester 


26 


212 


238 


Worcester 


12 


164 


176 



TOTAL: 



2588 



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Letter of Congratulations from the Commander-in-Chief, North American 
Aerospace Defense Command for the Group's performance during the November 
1974 Operational Readiness Inspection. 

Letter of Congratulations from the Commander, 21st Aerospace Division, 
North American Aerospace Defense Command, for the 102d Group's outstanding 
performance during that Division's Operational Readiness Evaluation by the 
Commander-in-Chief, North American Aerospace Defense Command. Staff Sergeants 
Douglas W. Fleck and Wilfred F. Lemieux, III, were especially singled out for 
particular appreciation by the Air Division Commander. 

Master Sergeant Gaspare Buonavita of the 102d Group won the Commandant's 
Award and Trophy for his outstanding performance at the Air National Guard Non- 
commissioned Officer Academy, Knoxville, Tennessee. 

2nd Lieutenant Thomas Gorman of the 101 Fighter Interceptor Squadron won 
the Distinguished Graduate Certificate from the United States Air Force Pilot 
Training School. 

There were two significant awards presented during FY 1976. The first 
was the Air Medal presented to 1st Lieutenant Thomas R. Gorman, 101st Fighter 
Interceptor Squadron, for his superior airmanship in November 1975. Lt Gorman 
experienced angine failure of his F-106A DELTA DART while flying an aerospace 
defense mission over New York State. He dead-sticked his aircraft into Albany 
State Airport on a short 6,000 foot runway. Lt Gorman was also awarded a 
"WELL DONE" certificate by Aerospace Defense Command. 

The second noteworthy award was earned by the 102d Fighter Group. The 
Secretary of the Air Force awarded the Air Force Outstanding Unit Award to 
the Group for exceptionally meritorious service in support of Aerospace Defense 
Operations on a sustained basis during the period 1 July 1974 to 30 June 1975. 

Many areas of community relations have experienced the participation of 
the 102d at Otis. Among the most significant were the following: 

On 17 April 1975 a serious fire broke out in the Town of Bourne forest area. 
Firefighters and Civil Engineering personnel of the 102d responded to a request 
for personnel and equipment. In the words of Chief Richard V. Raymond of the 
Bourne Fire Department: "Without their help, we would have suffered a fire loss 
of major proportions. It was only through their tireless efforts that we were 
able to bring the fire under control" . 

In addition, youth groups were supported where base assets permitted. Such 
organizations as the Arlington Catholic Memorial High School football team for 
Spring practice; the Ambassador Drum and Bugle Corps from Maiden for a special 
appearance on Cape Cod; and numerous tours for Girl and Boy Scout Troops. 

Support for the United Cerebral Palsy Telethon in Boston, and a March of 
Dimes Telethon in Hyannis were afforded special attention and were special 
events of wide significance. 



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The units provided men and equipment to transport a 10,000 gallon fuel tank 
from the Defense Property Disposal area at Otis to the Barnstable County 
Hospital. This item replaced a 3,000 gallon capacity facility. 

Multiple patriotic and bicentennial parades and special dedications by 
surrounding communities. On the Fourth of July 1975, aircraft flew a "ROUND 
ROBIN" of more than 10 fly-bys for many communities. 

Under the guidance of Master Sergeant Norbert Eischeid of the 102d Civil 
Engineering Flight, that unit assisted the Town of Bourne in a reforestation 
program in that town's forest necessitated by a large forest fire. 

During February 1976 the 102d units provided over 60 volunteers in support of 
the National Cerebral Palsy Telethon from TV Channel 38 in Boston. Volunteers 
manned telephones, provided security for collected monies, and assisted as 
escorts for victims of this dreaded disease who appeared on the program. 

Under the mutual assistance air pacts between Otis and the surrounding 
communities, fire fighting equipment and heavy earth movers were provided 
to augment local forces in combating forest fires. 

The base tour program now in force for many years was continued for such 
diversified groups and the Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, Mens Clubs, Kiwanis, 
and other fraternal and social societies from not only the local area, but 
from the Boston North shore as well. 

BARNES AIRPORT 

The 104th Tactical Fighter Group is charged with providing tactical air- 
power weapons systems for the delivery of conventional ordnance in support of 
ground operations. During Fiscal Year 1975, the Group sustained the top rating 
of C-l under the Joints Chiefs of Staff readiness criteria, successfully passed 
the Tactical Air Command Operational Readiness and Management Efficiency 
Annual Inspections, and performed assigned tasks as part of Joint Chiefs of 
Staff Exercise "BRAVE SHIELD X". The performance of this Group was of such 
quality as to warrant letters of commendation from the Vice Commander, Tactical 
Air Command, for both inspection excellence and exercise execution. 

Since deployment is a MUST with units assigned to Tactical Air Command 
missions, the 104th deployed to Phelps-Collins Air National Guard Permanent 
Field Training Site, Alpenna, Michigan, 31 August - 14 September 1974. During 
that period, the excellent air-to-ground gunnery ranges and other training 
facilities provided the aircrews and support personnel ample opportunity to 
sustain and sharpen their combat readiness. The 104th Civil Engineering Flight 
deployed to Lakenheath Air Base, United Kingdom, 3-17 August 1974, and completed" 
several engineer and building projects for the United States Air Forces 
tactical fighter units station at that overseas base. 

During Fiscal Year 1975, the 104th Group and some of its members won 
significant awards as follows: 



11 



State Tri-Color Matches: 

Pistol Team - Second Place (Third Prize: TSG Robert P. Jekanowski, 

CPT John Fedor - High Scorer) 

National Guard Association of Massachusetts Outstanding Airman of the 
Year: SSG Rolland M. Guyette 

Air National Guard Non-Commissioned Officers Honor Flight Commander's 
Award - TSG Bertrand E.N. Therrien 

Outstanding Graduate, USAF Flying Safety Course, University of Southern 

California - CPT Thomas F. Astaldi. Captain Astaldi attained a perfect 

100% for the course and was the recipient of a special letter of commendation 

from Brigadier General Charles R. Yeager ,USAF, the Air Force Director 

of Safety 

Presidency of the National Guard Association of Massachusetts - Major 
Edwin M. Renkowicz 



Junior Achievement Citations - Master Sergeants Albert A. Cote, 
Dithrich, and Howard J. Redpath 



Paul J. 



Letter jf Commendation from the Vice Commander, Tactical Air Command, 
for excellence in the May 1975 Operational Readiness and General In- 
spections 

Once again the 104th Tactical Fighter Group had an outstanding year in FY76. 
The Inspector General of Tactical Air Command during the unit's annual Operational 
Readiness & Management Effectiveness Inspections cited the outstanding pro- 
fessionalism demonstrated in the areas of fighter weapons delivery, safety, 
and command and control supervision in many areas. Because of its outstanding 
record, the group is programmed to be one the first Air National Guard Fighter 
Interceptor units in the Nation to perform its Annual Field Training during 
July 1976 at the Air Force Fighter Weapons Center, Nellis AFB, Nevada. This 
effort is entitled "RED FLAG", and demands that aircrews and support personnel 
perform under combat conditions, with hostile actions provided by selected 
personnel from the Fighter Weapons Center. 

Two individuals from the 104th Tactical Fighter Group were singularly 
honored during FY76. Sergeant Marcia L. Souvigney of the 131st Weather Flight 
was chosen the airman of the year by the National Guard Association of Massachu- 
setts, and was a guest of the annual convention held in Hyannis, Massachusetts. 
Major (MC) Richard B. Yules, Commander, 104th TAC Clinic, was designated as the 
Nation-Wide Air National Guard Flight Surgeon of the Year by the Director, Air 
National Guard. Dr. Yules was further nominated by the Chief, National Guard 
Bureau for the prestigious Malcolm Grow Award given each year to the outstanding 
Flight Surgeon in the entire Air Force. 



12 



Each year, more and more Air National Guard units are participating 
in the Joint Chiefs of Staff Exercises, During FY 76, the 104th Tactical 
Fighter Group participated in JCS Exercise "JACK FROST 76", staged from 
Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska, The F-100 aircraft flew to the exercise 
site from Barnes Base, with mid-air refuelings provided by Air Force and Air 
National Guard tanker aircraft. As a result of outstanding performance, the 
Group was awarded a special Certificate of Achievement. 

Once again, the 104th Group was cited for the fine record in flying 
safety. Tactical Air Command awarded the 104th the TAC Flying Safety Award 
for 1975-1976. 

The 104th Tactical Fighter Group has been noted in the past for its out- 
standing community relations program. Fiscal Year 1975 was no exception. Some 
of the more significant activities were as follows: 



SPONSOR 



PARTICIPANT 



Westfield Little League Baseball 
Westfield Youth Football League 
Citizens Scholarship Fund 
Junior Achievement Company 
United Fund Campaign 



American Red Cross Blood Donor Program 
Westfield WHIPS Glass Recycling 
Westfield Bicentennial Commission 
Westfield YMCA - Camp Shephard 
Pioneer Valley Boy Scout Council Camp Mosl 



PARADES 
Memorial Day 
Bicentennial 



Westfield & Russell 
Westhampton & Granville 



Western Massachusetts Hospital Paper Dri 
Westfield Public Works Department Play- 
grounds 

USAF Civil Air Patrol 
Junior ROTC - Technician High School 
Western New England College 



1 



SPECIAL ITEMS 

Assisted in two private aircraft accidents at Barnes Municipal Airport with 

Crash Fire personnel. 

Provided ambulance standby duty for use by the Westfield Police Department in 

emergencies. 

A particularly noteworthy event in FY76 was the Bicentennial Cannon Ball. The 
104th Tactical Fighter Group assisted the City of Westfield Bicentennial Committe* 
is planning, organizing, and directing a formal military ball in honor of | 
General Henry Knox of American Revolution fame. The event held on Barnes ANG | 
Base on 14 January 1976 commemorated the passage through that area of the cannon 
wagon train commanded by General Knox on his way to Boston. The event attracted 
over 1,200 citizens who danced in the ANG hangar to the music of the Army 
National Guard's 215th Army Band. Several members of the unit devoted over 
eight months to the planning sessions. 

Special Flag Day Ceremonies on 14 June 1976 marked the presentation of a 
stone fountain to the City of Westfield. Dedication ceremonies took place on 
the Westfield Green. 



13 



Members of the 104th Civil Engineering Flight volunteered their skills 
over a period of four months to completely reconstruct a 7-room house for 
habitation by a Vietnam Refugee family. 

Bicentennial Parades were not ignored. The 104th Color Guard, ANG 
Recruiters, and marching contingents participated in: 

Hampton Ponds Association Parade - 4 July 1976 

Holyoke's St. Patrick's Day Parade - March 1976 

Wilbraham Bicentennial Parade - May 1976 

Westfield, Russell & Southwick Memorial Day Parades - May 1976 

Northampton Bicentennial & Westfield Flag Day Parades 

Community assistance in emergencies and natural disaster incidents were supported 
by: • 

- Providing City of Westfield Human Services Department with portable 
heating units during severe cold weather conditions. 

- Providing on-scene crash-fire assistance for civilian airport authorities 
for private aircraft accidents & incidents. 

- Providing an ANG ambulance on standby basis for use by Westfield Police 
Department in emergencies. 

In order to provide a better community understanding of the 104th mission and 
to tell the Air Force/Air National Guard story there is an extensive base tour 
program which is constantly being conducted for such visiting groups as Boy 
Scouts, orphanages, Air Explorer Scouts, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Amercian 
Legion groups, and groups from such civic associations as Rotary Clubs, Kiwanis, 
and minority groups. Special attention is paid to the Equal Opportunity 
Program through a strong recruiting effort, news releases and bulletin board 
notices, and contact by the Group Equal Opportunity personnel with minority 
groups in the surrounding communities. 

WELLESLEY AND WORCESTER ANG STATIONS 



The 253rd Combat Communications Group participated in an annual training 
exercise entitled "SENTRY CASPEE" staged from the Newport Naval Air Station 
during the period 12-26 July 1976. The Group's units from Wellesley Massa- 
chusetts, New York, Maine, Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia joined 
to form a command/control network in support of the 156th Tactical Control Group, 
Rhode Island Air National Guard. The exercise was a test media for future 
operational readiness inspections in addition to providing a training vehicle 
for mobility deployments. 

Support of other bases and active Air Force Research & Development played a" 
significant part of the Group contribution during this period. The most signifi- 
cant projects were as follows: 



14 



Deployment of Digital Subscriber Terminal Equipment (DSTE) to Otis AFB 
during July and August 1975 to replace the Otis Communications Center major 
modification. The DSTE provided uninterrupted communications to support the 
vital NORAD link between Otis and Aerospace Command & Control. 

Exercise "BRAVE SHIELD XIII" required a Message Distribution Center (MDC) 
van during the period August-November 1975. The Wellesley unit deployed 
sufficient assets to completely service the requirement. 

Vital to the protection of NATO is an airborne Air Warning & Communications 
System (AWACS) being developed by the Mitre Coporatioft at Bedford, Massachusetts 
High frequency radio equipment for testing this new system was furnished togeth* 
with three (3) airmen personnel operators and maintenance assets. 

The 267th Combat Communications Squadron was selected as the Air Force 
Test unit for a new Tactical Weather system to be deployed with flying units 
on a world-wide basis. Throughout 1976, the squadron participated in four 
separate exercises named COLD TURKEY from its Sudbury Annex location. This 
advanced weather system was developed by the Air Force's Electronics Systems 
Division at Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts, with significant participation by 
members of the 267th Squadron. 

The operational readiness testing criteria of Air Force Communications 
Service underwent test changes during 1976. The Wellesley units were selected j 
to participate in Exercise "SENTRY SPIRIT" to determine their operational | 
readiness capability over a continuous 32-hour period on 12-13 June 1976. 
Other units of the 253rd Group in Maine, New York, Pennsylvania, and the District 
of Columbia joined to form a total command /control network, with Air Force j 
evaluators at each site. The performance was rated as excellent. Coupled 
with the Annual Management Evaluation Inspections conducted in November 1975, 
the results of Exercise "SENTRY SPIRIT" testify that the Group is in a high ' 
state of operational readiness. I 

Not to be outdone by the Wellesley performance, the 101st Tactical 
Control Squadron at Worcester ANG Station had a fine year. The unit was 
tasked by the Joint Chiefs of Staff to operate a radar Control & Reporting post 
for the control of tactical air operations with assigned forces during JCS 
Exercise "BRAVE SHIELD XII" conducted in the vicinity of Fort Hood, Texas 
during August 1975. The squadron deployed to Mc Gregor, Texas (on the outskirts 
of Waco, Texas) were a cantonement and operations site was established on land 
adjacent to Mc Gregor Airport. 

Squadron equipment was transported by surface to Westover AFB, MA from 
where it was airlifted along with unit personnel to Gray Army Air Field, 
Texas, the movement requiring 26 sorties of C-141 aircraft. From Gray AAF 
personnel and equipment were moved by surface to Mc Gregor, Texas. The cantone- 
ment area included a field kitchen and dining area, a medical dispensary, 
supply tents, showering and washing facilities, sufficient tents for quartering 
the entire unit and visiting dignitaries, recreation area and a Headquarters/ 
Administrative tent. The operational site included the operations shelters, 
radar set, radio set, communications vans, and all equipment required to operat< 
a viable Tactical Air Control System 407L Control and Reporting Post. During th< 
exercise the squadron controlled 463 Close Air Support. Interdiction and Re- 
connaissance sorties. On the afternoon of 22 August 1975 an aircraft crashed 

15 



in the unit's area of responsibility. The 101st controlled search and re- 
covery aircraft involved in the successful recovery of the pilot. At the con- 
clusion of the joint exercise the unit redeployed to home station with per- 
sonnel and equipment being airlifted in the same manner as the deployment 
phase. For its noteworthy accomplishments during the Exercise the 101st 
Tactical Control Squadron was awarded the United States Readiness Command 
Joint Readiness Certificate. In awarding this certificate USREDCOM saluted 
the 101st for its Joint Combat Skills as displayed on Brave Shield XII during 
the period 11-31 August 1975. The certificate was signed by Winton W. Marshall, 
Lt W. Marshall, Lt General, USAF, Deputy Commander-in-Chief, USREDCOM and 
John J. Hennessey, General, US Army, Commander-in-Chief, USREDCOM. 

On the 31st of March 1976, the 101st Tactical Control Flight (FACP) was 
discontinued as a unit of the Massachusetts Air National Guard, and its per- 
sonnel were absorbed into the parent 101st Tactical Control Squadron at the 
same Worcester ANG Base. Equipment of the discontinued Flight was redistributed 
to active Air Force units, mostly in Europe for NATO defense. 

PERSONNEL 

Throughout 1975-1976, all units of the Massachusetts Air National Guard parti- 
cipated in a highly diversified Recruiting and Retention Program. Activities 
included bccths at various fairs, to include the mammoth New England States 
Exposition at Springfield, Massachusetts; increase of classified advertising 
in local newspapers; handout items such as calendards, license plate frames, 
bumper stickers, and other trinkets; specialized literature distribution to 
area businesses in the form of "help wanted" folders relating to vacancies 
with accompanying mail-back cards; appearances on local TV stations; and added 
emphasis on increasing the immediate follow-up of other inquiries have produced 
a highly action effort. Like all Reserve Components, the Air National Guard 
is experiencing the end of the National draft Impact and expiration of many 
6-year enlistments by obligors. The program theme is to acquire motivated 
volunteers for the "long term" and thus provide a stable force for better total 
readiness. 

Strong emphasis was placed on the recruitment of minority groups. This effort 
is reflected in a new gain of over 20 female airmen in a diversified spectrum 
of military career fields such as aircraft maintenance, weather, security police, 
and command/control functions. As of 30 June 1976, the table reflected the 
following: 



Black Males 


26 


Spanish-American Males 


12 


American Indian Males 


6 


WAF Officers 


2 


*WAF Airmen 


83 


Nurses, Female 


5 



TOTAL : 



134 



*Includes four (A) black females. 



16 



Throughout Fiscal Year 1975-1976 the Air Guard continued to be the principal f" 
operating representative of the Air Force Aerospace Defense Command and _ 
National Guard Bureau at Otis Air Base. The Air Guard 102d Fighter Interceptor 
Wing with its 102d Fighter Interceptor Group at Otis, and similar missioned » 
groups at Atlantic City, New Jersey, and Jacksonville, Florida, constitute I 
a large part of the manned aircraft aerospace defense of the Eastern seaboard. 



17 




Volunteers from the Westfield Air Guard Civil Engineers are laying 
telephone poles to make the frame for a foot bridge to be used by 
children attending the YMCA day camp. 




Members of the Springfield Technical High SchoolJr. AROTC unit are 
shown the business end of an Air Guard F-100 during their annual field 
day at the Westfield base. 



[ 
[ 
I 

[ 

I 



ORGANIZATION CHART, HHD MA ARNG AND MILITARY DIVISION 



GOVERNOR 

CCMMANDER- 

IN-CHIEF 



THE 

ADJUTANT 
GENERAL 



SENIOR 

ARMY 

ftDYTSQR. 



26 INF DIV 
EMPLOYEES 
<^ r /l8A.Ch-nl 



ASST AG 
FOR AIR 



JAG 



ALTERNATE 
HEADQUARTERS 



"L 



PROGRAM 
DEVELOP- 
MENT OFFICE 



WAC 
ADVISOR 



CHAPIAIN 



IG 



ADMIN & FIN 
DIVISION 



CONSTRUCTION 
& FACILITIES 
PTVTSTON 




ASSISTANT 

ADJUTANT 

GENERAL 



I 



PUBLIC 
AFFAIRS 

DIVISION 

I 



6£ PI 

DETACHMENT 



MILITARY PER- 
SONMEL DIVI- 
SION 



mt \ 




n 



STATE 
GUARD 



SUPPLY & 
SERVICES 
DIVISION 



0- 
i 


i 



PUNS, SEC- 
URITY & TNG 
DIVISION 



•0 
i 



CAMP 
EDWARDS 



HEADQUARTERS 
DETACHMENT 



0-0-0 



EEO 



STATE 
SURGEON 




AASF/AAFA 



RRO 



STAFF SUPERVISION 



COORDINATION 



SELECTIVE 
SERVICE 



-0-0-0-0- OPERATIONAL CONTROL 



18 



I 



[ 
s 
I 



ALTERNATE HEADQUARTERS 

The Alternate Headquarters is an integral part of Headquarters and 
Headquarters Detachment, Massachusetts Army National Guard. Located in 
Natick, this twelve-man unit is commanded by a Major General and provides 
a nucleus of command, control, administration, intelligence, operations, 
logistics, and communications-electronics expertise. 

The Alternate Headquarters is designed to be the tactical command post 
in the event of mobilization and to exercise operational control of all 
military forces within the Commonwealth, including active military units 
assigned to Massachusetts in an emergency. Moreover, the Alternate Head- 
quarters has the capability of assuring continuity of communications and 
command in the event of incapacitation or destruction of State Headquarters. 

Assignment to Alternate Headquarters staff positions is also used to ex- 
pand the professional development of key officers and non-commissioned officers, 
and to prepare them for the assumption of increased responsibilities at higher 
levels of command and staff. 

TRAINING AND OPERATION 

The main function of the Alternate Headquarters during the normal training 
year is to develop and administer highly sophisticated and realistic exercises 
to test the effectiveness of operational plans and procedures for Guard units 
throughout the Commonwealth. 

The Command Post Exercises (CPX) and Field Tactical Exercises simulate 
the environment and situations troop units might encounter in carrying out 
their missions. As such, they are invaluable tools for commanders to evaluate 
and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their operations, and to prepare 
their units for a wide range of contingencies. 

Included among the exercise conducted by Alternate Headquarters are: 

a. Statewide and regional Civil Disturbance Operations; 

b. Combat, Combat Support, and Combat Service Support Operations; 

c. Statewide and regional Civil Defense (Natural Disaster) Operations. 

The Alternate Headquarters prepares Field Tactical Exercises to administer 
to the 26th (YANKEE) Infantry Division and all of its subordinate commands. 
The exercises are conducted at Camp Edwards and encompass the full range of 
operational situations necessary to satisfy U.S. Army readiness requirements. 



19 



TECHNICIAN PERSONNEL OFFICE - 

Under the provisions of Public Law 90-486, The Adjutant General of 
Massachusetts is vested with the authority to employ and administer 
Massachusetts National Guard Technicians. The Technician Personnel Office 
(TPO) carries out The Adjutant General's policies with regard to the technician ■ 
program and is responsible for the administration of, and the personnel services 
for, approximately 1500 Army and Air National Guard Technicians. P 

National Guard technicians are Federal Civil Service Employees in the Ex- 
cepted Service; that is, membership in the National Guard is a prerequisite a 
for employment for 95% of the positions. The remaining 5% may be occupied eitheJ 
by competitive Civil Service Employees or members of the National Guard. Federal 
funds support this program and United States Civil Service Commission regulations 
are applicable, in most part, to technicians. I 



ORGANIZATION AND RESPONSIBILITY 

The Technician Personnel Office (TPO) is located at the United States Property 
and Fiscal Office Facility, Natick, Massachusetts, The Technician Personnel 
Office responsibilities include, but are not restricted to, the following: 

- Technician Recruitment 

- Management of Army and Air Manning Structures 

- Technician Regulations 

- Employee-Management Labor Relations Program 

- Health and Insurance Programs 

- Performance Ratings 

- Incentive Awards 

- Technician Training 

- Retirement Counselling 

- Alcohol and Drug Program 

- Publication of Technician Information Bulletins and Job Announcements 

- Maintenance of Official Personnel Files and Records 

- Technician Personnel Management Information System (Data Processing) 

- Employees' Grievances, Appeals, and Classifications 

- Workman's Compensation Claims 



20 



Listed below is the number of employed technicians as of the end of each month 
for Fiscal Year 1975, 



MONTH 

July 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

Jun 



ARMY NG 

900* 

826 
826 
815 
809 
804 
808 
813 
813 
811 
831 
832 



AIR NG 

643 
637 
637 
648 
654 
656 
648 
646 
650 
619 
617 
589 



TOTAL 

1543 
1463 
1463 
1463 
1463 
1460 
1456 
1459 
1463 
1450 
1448 
1421 



Listed below is the number of employed technicians as of the end of each month 
for Fiscal Year 1976. 



MONTH 



ARMY NG 



AIR NG 



TOTAL 



July 

Aug 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 



846* 

794 

791 

787 

762 



609 
599 
600 
603 
587 



1455 
1393 
1391 
1390 
1349 



Dec 
Jan 
Feb 
Mar 
Apr 
May 
Jun 



759 
760 
761 
782 
806 
830 
818 



593 
587 
588 
589 
587 
587 
590 



1352 
1347 
1349 
1371 
1393 
1417 
1408 



* Includes technicians employed for the Summer Hire Program 

LABOR-MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 

At the present time there are four labor unions representing the Army and Air 
National Guard technicians. 

- Local 1629, National Federation of Federal Employees (NFFE) represents 
all Army NG technicians. Contract negotiations are in progress. 

- Local 1670, National Federation of Federal Employees (NFFE) represents 

the Air National Guard technicians employed at the Worcester and Wellesley 
Air National Guard Stations. The contract, originally negotiated for a 
two year period, continues in effect because of the automatic renewal 
provision which it contains. 

- Local 3004, American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE) represents 
the Air National Guard technicians at the Air National Guard Facility, Otis 
AFB. The contract expires in January 1977. A new contract is expected to 



21 



be negotiated on or about the time of termination of the current contract. 

- Western Massachusetts Chapter, Association of Civilian Technicians (ACT) 
represents the Air National Guard technicians employed at Barnes Municipal 
Airport, Westfield, Massachusetts. No contract is in effect at this time. 
It is planned that a new contract will be negotiated following the negotia- 
tions of the contract with Local 3004, AFGE. 

SIGNIFICANT EVENTS 
New Technician Authorizations 

During Fiscal Year 1975 operation and control of the Camp Edwards Army Training 
area was transferred to the Massachusetts Army National Guard which resulted 
in the authorization of three new technician positions. It is anticipated that 
additional technician positions will be authorized and funded based on the in- 
creased operational requirements and the increased use of the training facility 
by National Guard and Reserve units. 

The Joint Uniform Military Pay System (JUMPS) , was established during FY 1975 
and provided eleven new positions within the United States Property and Fiscal 
Office. Technicians, assigned to these positions, attended special training 
either at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Indiana or at the National Guard Professional 
Education Center, Little Rock, AK. 

The 1059th Medical Detachment Helicopter-Ambulance was organized on 1 Dec 1975. 
The Aircraft and the Support Facility were located at Fitchburg Municipal 
Airport, initially, and has since been relocated to Westover AFB. Thirteen 
technicians man this facility. 

Reorganizations 

Reorganizations of the Maintenance and Supply Sections for the Air National 
Guard Flying units at Otis AFB and Barnes Airport resulted in some technician 
turbulence, however, no technician was separated although a few were downgraded. 

The Technician Personnel Office was reorganized on 1 July 1975 and resulted in 
the loss of one position. 



Reductlons-in-Force (RIF) 

On 4 February 1974, the Department 
NIKE HERCULES Air Defense Units in 
state, the 1st Bn (Nike Here) 241st 
October 1974, resulting in the loss 
Through the cooperation and efforts 
officials and labor, all Air Defens 
cian employment were accommodated, 
continue to receive the salaries of 
"save pay" period. The following i 



of Defense announced the phasing out of all 

the Continental United States. In this 
Air Defense Artillery phased out during 
of more than 200 technician positions, 
of the National Guard Bureau, management 

e technicians who desired to remain in techni- 
Those who were placed in lower grade positions 
their previous grade during a two year 

s a summary of personnel actions: 



22 



Number of technicians reassigned to other positions within 
Massachusetts Army National Guard 

Number of technicians reassigned to positions within Air 
National Guard 



136 



12 



- Number of technicians transferred to other states 



18 



- Number of technicians who retired 



Number of technicians who opted to resign (all but one 
received severance pay) 



28 



A second reduction-in-force in the technician program occured with the 
elimination of 57 security guard positions at the Air National Guard facility, 
Otis AFB. The National Guard Bureau was unable to allocate additional 
funding to retain these displaced technicians, although, 23 were retained 
in Federal employment as follows: 

- Technicians reassigned to positions in the Mass Air National 

Guard at other bases 5 



Technicians employed by the Mass Army National Guard at Camp 
Edwards 



8 



- Technicians transferred to other agencies 



10 



In April 1975, the Massachusetts Army National Guard underwent reorganization, 
which resulted in a third major reduction-in-force. The immediate impact on 
the technician work force, however, was limited to the operations and training 
program (organizational and unit level technicians) . Through careful planning 
and the cooperation and assistance of the National Guard Bureau, Management 
Officials and Labor, no technician was forced to separate although a few job 
reassignments did occur. In those situations where downgrading action was re- 
quired, the technicians involved will continue to receive their present 
salaries for a period of two years under the "save pay" provisions of applicable 
regulations. 



, VT>. 

■ 



23 



TECHNICIAN TRAINING 



Training of Massachusetts technicians has provided for the development 
of their skills, improve service and performance, and to provide for up- 
ward mobility of each technician. Courses have been programmed for tech- 
nicians to attend U.S. Civil Service Commission courses, Military Service 
Schools, the National Guard Education Center (NGPEC) , and Civilian Education 
Institution. Priority for training has been scheduled for the training of 
Administrative Supply Technicians and Reduction-In-Force personnel (Nike- 
Hercules) . NGPEC has allocated 52 spaces to Massachusetts for FY 77 AST 
training. In addition to this training, NGPEC have scheduled Operation 
Training and Readiness Specialist Courses, JUMPS training, and various 
other personnel courses. The following is a list of training attended by 
technician in the ANG and ARNG during FY 75 and FY 76 



Type of Course 



Executive Development & Management 

Supervisory (Phase I & II) 

Legal, Medical, Scientific/Engineering 

Administration and Analysis 

Speciality /technical 

Clerical 

Trade or Craft 

Orientation for Labor-Management Relations, 

Race Relations 

Adult Education 

Administrative Supply Technician 



Number Trained 



FY 75 


FY 76 


3 


1 


65 


63 


10 


2 


29 


21 


58 


21 


14 


1 


55 


48 


65 


22 


5 








60 



The reduction- in-force of the Air Defense technicians (Nike-Hercules) in 1974 
had led to numerous reassingments which required additional training for 
these personnel. In FY76/7T funding was allocated for this training in which 
$140,000 was given to support this program. Included in these funds was the 
support for regular training. However, Congressional restrictions limited the 
type of training ARNG technicians were able to attend. These funds did not 
include courses at NGPEC. Funding allocated for RIF training in FY 77 totals 
$87,800. These funds are to support only ADA RIF technicians. The cut-off 
date for the completion of this training is 1 June 1977. Funds allocated for 
regular technician training for FY 77 is $19,200. Additional funds are expected 
in the mid-year budget forecast. These funds will provide for training in 
supervisory courses, executive management training, new equipment training, 
U.S. Civil Service Commission Courses, etc.. Additionally $19,025 was allocated 
for FY 76 and $12,080 for FY 77 for ANG training. 

INCENTIVE AWARDS 



Each National Guard Technician, ANG/ARNG, is required to have a performance 
rating made on him/her annually. Persons receiving an Outstanding or Excellent 
are considered for a Quality Salary Increase or a Sustained Superior Performance 
awards. The National Guard Technician Program encourages employees to perform 
at their highest level and recognize those technicians whose performance are 
above the norm. Quality Salary Increase are used by management as an incentive 

24 



I 



to stimulate sustained high quality job performances of employees. 
Special Achievement Awards (Sustained Superior Performance) are warrented 
when an individual performance clearly exceeds the standards for satisfactory 
performance. This award is available to both categories of employees, 
General Schedule and Wage Grade. Other Incentive Awards are provided as an 
effective means of achieving greater efficiency and economy, by encouraging' 
active participation by all National Guard technicians, in improving De- 
partment of Defense and other Federal government operations. The following 
awards were made : 



FY 75 



FY 76 



22 


30 


22 


8 


2 





2 


2 



Quality Salary Increases 
Sustained Superior Performance 
Special Acts 
Suggestions 

The total of cash awards for Sustained Superior Performance and Special 
Acts was FY 75 $4,400/FY 76 $3,512. The awards for adopted suggestions were 
FY 75 $120/FY 76 $1,304. 



25 



MILITARY PERSONNEL DIVISION 



This Division consists of a Director, six State employees and eleven 
Federal Technicians. It is divided into 2 major sections - - Officer 
and Enlisted, having the responsibility of maintaining approximately 
14,000 records; giving guidance in the submission of personnel data by 
publishing directives to subordinate units and by personal contact; de- 
termining personnel actions, such as separations, questionable enlistments, 
and qualifications for Officer promotion and appointment; and maintaining 
close liaison with the Federal sector in all personnel matters. 

At the outset, it is important to note that we are beginning to prepare 
for ultimate entry into SIDPERS (Standard Installation/Division Personnel 
System) . This program, which will require substantial planning and effort 
in its implementation, is being developed in gradual stages by way of 
directives from the National Guard Bureau and will have the effect of making 
our personnel record system completely compatible with the Active Services. 
SIDPERS correlates with the expansion of the automated personnel data system, 
which probably was the most significant development during FY 1975. 

The Division developed and administered a method of purifying individual per- 
sonnel records, and included a series of state-wide instructional sessions 
with organizational and unit personnel responsible for its implementation 
and up-date. This effort, together with continuing supervision and close 
cooperation with USPFO, permitted the Massachusetts Army National Guard to 
enter into the Joint Uniform Military Pay System (JUMPS) with an extraordinary 
error rate of approximately 2/10s of 1%, (.002), a large portion of which 
is not correctible at this level since it involves out-of-state-transfers, 
creating duplications, and will have to be solved at the National Guard 
Bureau level. 

The expansion of the automated system opens up consideration for management 
use by all other divisions. 

OFFICERS SECTION 

During FY 75, an unusual amount of time had to be allocated by the Officers 
Section due to an extensive re-organization of the Massachusetts Army National 
Guard. Besides the development of administrative instructions for the 
guidance of subordinate units, this section had the responsibility of collecting 
and posting various officer actions, such as Branch changes and re-assignments. 
Further, it had to process the numerous unit rosters involved, requiring 
detailed screening and correction, and eventual forwarding to National Guard 
Bureau for further screening. All officer changes must be reflected on a 
Position Designation Card and an Individual Personnel Data Card which must 
conform with like records at the National Guard Bureau. Upon comparison with 
Bureau records, no errors were detected. 



26 



Officers Evaluation Reports became a serious problem because of these 
various changes, and considerable effort, continuing through the close of 
the fiscal year, had to be exerted on organizations to accomplish the 
task. An officer's evaluation report usually forms the basis for his career 
progression. 

During this reporting period, the Officers Section set up and administered 
two retention boards to consider the retention or non-retention of 162 
officers and warrant officers. This required the personal notification of 
each officer and his right to present material in his behalf; a form was 
developed to facilitate this process. 

Routinely, the Section provided subordinate units with monthly personnel 
data print-outs, as well as position rosters, both of which constitute 
effective management tools for the commanders. Also, for management purposes, 
furnished periodically are print-outs of Officer Evaluation Reports Suspense 
Rosters and Medical Examination Suspense Rosters. 

During FY 1975, the Section processed 101 initial appointments, 198 separations, 
111 promotions, and 126 changes of Branch/MOS. These actions required con- 
stituting, and rendering administrative support to, Federal Recognition Boards, 
which were scheduled on a monthly basis, and more often when required, for a 
total of 18. 

This Directorate promulgated and developed a Warrant Officer Career Guidance 
Council with the specific responsibility of assisting each Warrant Officer 
in maintaining his technical proficiency in his assigned specialty. A TAGMA 
Pamphlet (No. 600-3), detailing this program, was prepared, published and 
distributed to all Warrant Officers in the Mass ARNG. It is too early to de- 
termine the success of this program, but available signs seem hopeful. 

ENLISTED SECTION 

Innovatively, this section felt a need for, and developed, a Discharge Re- 
view Board for the purpose of reviewing appeals of individuals receiving less 
than Honorable Discharges. We know of no state with such a program. Guidelines 
were established and eight cases were considered. This procedure obviates the 
expenditure of considerable time and money by an aggrieved individual, who 
heretofore had to appeal to a federal review board. Now, our discharges have 
the opportunity to presenting locally evidence not shown in his military record 
and which could affect the type of discharge warranted — long delayed reform. 

This section has undertaken the sole responsibility for the supervision of 
all Line of Duty determinations and incapacitation pay. This consolidated 
what had previously been a divided operation with resulting delays in providing 
benefits where merited, and, in many instances, unnecessarily subjecting the 
Government to substantial payments. The present procedure requires this 
section to be in close contact with units, claimants, Federal medical facilities, 
the State Surgeon, and National Guard Bureau Personnel Section and the Comp- 
troller Section. 



27 



During FY 75, this office was assigned responsibility for the Military 
Occupational Specialty (MOS) Testing Program, which seeks to determine 
the proficiency of an individual in a particular specialty and grade 
level and their conduct requires a degree of security. An average number 
of 740 individuals were tested quarterly. 

Microfilming of enlisted discharge records continues to progress at an 
acceptable rate and at close of FY 75 we had accomplished approximately 90% 
of the discharges for calendar year 1973. Since inception in 1972 of per- 
forming our own microfilming we have completed over 16,000 records. 

This office implemented the Automated Enlistment and Training Space Management 
System, known as "Operation Request", a nation-wide time-sharing computer 
service, using a national telecommunications network capable of simultaneously 
accessing a common data bank containing the Army training base, and, simply, 
provides a modern, speedy, electronic method of obtaining initial active duty 
training spaces for our non-prior service enlistees. This has proven to be 
a great improvement on the previous telephonic method in that the individual 
learns much earlier where and when he will enter training. 

In our efforts to provide as much assistance as possible to the commander, 
we provide routinely (monthly) computer print-outs containing enlisted per- 
sonnel data which commanders may use in the personnel management of their 
units. Other tools provided include Expiration of Term of Service (ETS) 
Suspense Roster which alerts commanders for career counseling and for planning 
possible re-enlistment of trained personnel; rosters of personnel eligible for 
MOS testing; physical examination suspense rosters; sex, race and ethnic 
group rosters; and post locator files for use at annual training. 

In June of 1975, an Enlisted Qualitative Retention Board, was set up and 
administered by this office. Over 450 individual records were screened for 
retention determination. This office accumulated the personnel files from 
the field and prepared them for the Board's consideration. Correspondence 
to each member considered was accomplished by this office. 

Cases involving those individuals who fail to participate in an acceptable 
manner were handled either by application of Army Regulation 135-91, which 
provides for involuntary order to active service or by presentation of the 
facts to the Unsuitability Board, which this section maintains and supervises. 
Unsatisfactory Participation cases for FY 75, statistically read as follows: 

Ordered to Active Duty 70 

Cases Pending on Appeal 29 

Referred to Unsuitability Board 8 



28 



m^^i 



iw 



^H 



This number is considerably less than in previous years, and is attributable 
mainly to personal counseling by The Adjutant General, the Assistant Adjutant 
General, and/or the Director of Personnel. As a result of these interviews, 
much personal and family problem factors were uncovered and more compassionate 
disposition was made in those cases. The Unsuitability and Unfitness Board 
met 5 times, and considered and disposed of 61 cases. 

Finally, as a result of Congressional Action, retroactive pay for October, 
November and December of 1973 had to be processed. Eligible former members 
were required to apply, and, accordingly, there was wide-spread publicity 
through the organizations and units, state-wide radio and television, and 
state-wide newspaper dissemination. We received and processed over 300 claims 
to the U.S. Army Finance Center, Indianapolis, Indiana, for direct payment. 
It was understood that this would be a one-time effort; however, because of 
litigation pending in the State of California, where the contention is that 
the Government has the burden to make payment without the necessity of those 
entitled having to apply, it may become necessary to allocate thousands of 
man-hours into the accomplishment of this task. 

Fiscal year 1976 saw rapid developments in projects started earlier and the in- 
stitution of new areas. The following part of this report will cover these as 
briefly and concisely as possible. 

1. PRIVACY ACT 



Implementation of the Privacy Act, enacted by Congress in 1974, be- 
came a problem during the period of this report. The Director of Personnel 
personally conducted meetings, showing the film prepared for that purpose, and 
discussing the meaning and intent of the Act with technicians and commanders. 
The Director decided that a simplified explanation, capsuling the reams of 
material, was necessary. 

A memorandum, with attachments, covering the areas most likley to 
confront units was prepared and distributed on 1 July 1976. 

2. WEIGHT CONTROL PROGRAM 

Work was started on the preparation of a continuing program of weight 
reduction throughout the Massachusetts Army National Guard. Conferences were 
held with Army Readiness Region I representatives and with Army installations 
where programs were developed. It became apparent that medical considerations 
were a serious factor and the target date for commencement of the program was 
set upon the resolution of that factor. 

3. WARRANT OFFICER CAREER GUIDANCE 

This fiscal year saw the rapid development by this office of a Warrant 
Officer Career Guidance Program. A council was constituted, guide lines es- 
tablished, and a counseling program initiated. 



29 



A TAGMA Pamphlet to provide Warrant Officers a ready reference of 
available courses, both resident and non-resident, to facilitate MOS 
qualification and to maintain MOS proficiency, is being prepared, with 
target date of 1 August 1976. 

4. STATE ACTIVE DUTY AWARD 

A committee has been formed to study the feasibility of this type 
of award and to detail guidelines if found to be practical. 

5. MONTHLY DRILL ATTENDANCE 

A computer program was developed by a member of the Personnel Section 
to show percentages of attendance during inactive duty training. The print- 
out, a monthly effort, gives an accurate picture of how each unit conducts 
its training by providing percentage of those present, percentage of authorized 
absence and percentage of AWOL's. 

6. COMPUTERIZED ALARM LISTS 

By end of fiscal year, this program was well advanced and target 
for completion, 31 December 1976, remained valid. 

The computer program will have to be carefully guarded because of 
the danger of disseminating personal information to unauthorized persons 
in violation of the Privacy Act. 

7. STRENGTHS 

At the beginning of Fiscal Year 1976, our total authorized strength 
was 12,443. Our total assigned strength was 12,221, for a minus of 22 members 
or a strength percentage of 98%. . 

At the close of Fiscal Year 1976, our authorized strength was 12,456; 
our assigned strength was 10,379, for a minus of 2,077 or a strength percentage 
of 83%. 

8. OFFICER PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (OPMS) 



By the close of FY 76 an OPMS manager had been appointed, a committee 
formed, and the program started. The first requirement in promulgating the 
System was the conversion of Duty MOSs to Specialty Skill Identifiers (SSIs) 
and the determination of ASIs (Additional Skill Identifiers) , with an im- 
plementation date of 31 December 1976. 

The conversion to SSIs was accomplished before 30 June 1976 and 
preparations were started to develop guidelines for identifying additional 
skills. It was decided to prepare a questionnaire to all officers to 
facilitate this task, and work on this was begun. 



30 



This System, when instituted, will be compatible with Army 
identifications and will aid the career development of our officer corps. 

9. ENLISTED PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EPMS) 

This System encompasses all aspects of personnel management including 
such major areas as procurement, education and training, testing and evaluation, 
classification, promotion and retention. 

The initial effort is the restructuring of Military Occupation 
Specialists (MOSs) by consolidating, creating, and deleting. Groups of 
these specialists will be converted at staggered intervals to ease entrance 
into the System. 

EPMS will see the phasing out of the MOS Test and replacing it will 
be a Skill Qualification Test (SQT) . SQT's may be made up of three components 
depending upon the MOS — Task Certification (i.e. Annual Arms Qualification), 
Hands-On, and Written, with a Soldiers Manual as the guide for all enlisted 
persons to follow. 

We have indications that the SQT will be delayed, and some thought 
is being given to conducting a battalion practice run to determine some of 
the areas in which we could expect difficulties. 



31 



PLANS, SECURITY AND TRAINING DIVISION 



The Plans, Security and Training Division is specifically responsible 



for : 



a. Preparing, coordinating, maintaining and publishing State-level op- 
erations plans and supporting documents for Federal and State emergency missions 
assigned to the Mass ARNG. 

b. Reviewing emergency plans for subordinate units. 

c. Planning exercises necessary to test and exercise emergency plans. 

d. Establishing, coordinating, organizing and operating a State-wide 
communication (radio) system to include maintenance of equipment and publication 
of required instructions. 

e. Producing intelligence to include the collection of information, the 
conversion of information into intelligence, and the dissemination of intelligence 
pertinent to emergency operations during natural disasters or civil disturbances. 

f . Maintaining liaison with local, State and Federal law enforcement 
agencies. 

g. Supervising and administering counterintelligence activities to include 
the protection of sensitive information, the protection of personnel against 
subversion, and protection of installations against sabotage, intrusion or theft. 

h. Scheduling security inspections and surveys. Conducting periodic un- 
announced security inspections to insure compliance with all pertinent directives. 

i. Developing procedures to safeguard classified documents. 

j, Implementing and supervising the security education program. 

k. Processing security clearances. 

1. Reproducing and distributing maps, charts, and overlays. 

Three unclassified emergency missions have been assigned to the Massachusetts 
ARNG either by Federal or State statute or regulation as indicated below. A 
fourth emergency mission, classified as SECRET, has been assigned but will not 
be discussed in this report. 



32 



krStajkVVfc^tVPii - : A;t&. .:*&* 



EMERGENCY MISSION 



OPLAN NO. 



TYPE OF EMERGENCY 

Military Support of Civil Defense 
in the event of Nuclear Attack. 

Military Support of Civil Authorities 
in the event of civil disturbances or 
natural disaster. 

Mobilization Plan to provide for the 
mobilization of ARNG units under a call 
or order to active Federal service. 



The supporting documents for the plans are maintained by this section 
Domestic Emergency Standing Operation Procedures (DESOP) 



Communications-Electronics Standing Instructions 

Communications-Electronics Operating Instructions 

Fiscal Year 1975 proved to be most interesting and challenging year for 
this Division. Six highly significant and important events occurred. The 
mobilization of NG units by the Commander-in-Chief in October 1974 for the 
Boston School Integration situation; a major reorganization of the MA ARNG; 
security requirements for the Concord-Lexington Bicentennial Celebration on 
18-19 April 1975; planning and execution of a National Bicentennial Parade in 
Boston on 19 April 1975; a National Guard Bureau directed reorganization of 
technician manning of the Division; and the acquisition of Camp Edwards as a 
weekend /annual training site. 

In June 1975, the National Guard Bureau directed a reorganization of the 
Directorate into two divisions, i.e., a Plans, Operations and Military Support 
Division and a Training and Readiness Division, with appropriate Federal techni- 
cian manning. Additionally, The Adjutant General directed that the DPST continue 
staff supervision of the ARNG Aviation Division and the OCS/NCO Academy Division 
as well as operational control of Camp Edwards. Prior to the conclusion of the 
period of this report control of Camp Edwards was separated from this Division. 

FY 1976 proved to be another interesting and challenging year for this 
Division. Eight highly significant and important events occurred which challenged 
the skills and expertise of the personnel of this Division. 

a. Sep 1975. Two battalions were ordered to State Active Duty to 
support the Boston Police Department during the implementation of Phase 2 of 
the School Integration Plan. 

b. Nov 1975. Selected personnel of the 101st Engineer Company and 
a Helicopter Ambulance Detachment were added to the MA ARNG troop list. 

d. Dec 1975. Because of the addition of a new Army Aviation element, 

33 



1059th Med Det (Hel Amb) , a new Army Aviation Flight Activity- 
was activated at Fitchburg, Massachusetts. 

e. Jan 1976. A decision was made to reactivate the MA ARNG Non- 
commissioned Officers Academy after a one-year hiatus. 

f. Jan 1976. At the request of the City of Boston, selected 
members of this Division were detailed to assist in preparation and planning 
for the visit of Queen Elizabeth II of England. 

g. May 1976. A reorganization plan for HHD, MA ARNG was completed 
and became effective 1 July 1976. 

h. Jun 1976. At the request of the Mayor of Boston, the Governor 
approved State Active Duty for approximately 800 troops to provide assistance 
to the Boston Police Department on 10-11 July 1976 for the arrival of the Tall 
Ships and Queen Elizabeth. 

DIVISION PERSONNEL MANNING 

The DPST is manned by full-time Federal employees as well as members of 
the Massachusetts ARNG assigned to State Headquarters who perform their inactive 
duty training (IDT) and annual training (AT) with the Division. With two ex- 
ceptions, Federal employpes are also members of the Headquarters & Headquarters 
Detachment. The following chart summarizes the authorized personnel manning 
of DPST. 



BRANCHES 



Director 



Plans & Operations Branch 
Training & Readiness Branch 



Aviation Branch 



OCS/NCO Academy Branch 



Communications Section 



FEDERAL 


STATE 


HHD MASS 


ARNG 


EMPLOYEES 


EMPLOYEES 


OFF 


ENL 


3 





2 


2 


3 





4 


2 


3 





6 


2 


2 





2 


1 


2 





15 


11 








1 


10 



TOTALS 



13 







30 



28 



34 



!6fttei£>ftfc<i: fa^witiBkA 



PLANS, OPERATIONS AND MILITARY SUPPORT BRANCH 



Early in FY 75 contingency plans were developed in anticipation of a 
possible deployment of units of the Massachusetts National Guard to assist the 
City of Boston in the implementation of a Federal District Court order to de- 
segregate schools by forced busing. This action, termed Phase I, of a long 
term desegregation plan would involve the busing of high school students to 
various districts of the city to achieve a better ethnic balance within the 
school population. 

Liaison was established with city and state police agencies and key 
personnel observed methods, actions, and operations within and immediately 
surrounding high schools in South Boston and Hyde Park. 

A series of incidents, including the stoning of school buses, led the 
Governor of the Commonwealth to order a limited mobilization of National Guard 
units. On 15 October 1974, members of the 685th Military Police Battalion, 
the 26th Military Police Company and Company A, 1st Battalion 220th Infantry 
were ordered to State Active Duty and placed in standby alert. Commander, 26th 
Infantry Division was designated as Task Force Commander. 

During the alert period intensified civil disturbance training was conducted 
in riot control tactics. Troops were briefed on the mission, rules or engagement 
and special orders. Continuous inspection and screening was conducted to insure 
all personnel were properly equipped and presented a soldierly appearance. 

A force of approximately 500 remained on duty. The initial force was re- 
lived on 20 October by elements of the 1st Squadron 26th Cavalry and B Company, 
1st Battalion, 220th Infantry. In turn that force was relieved on 27 October 
by 101st Engineer Battalion personnel. 

Since police elements seemed sufficient to control the situation, on 
3 November the standby force was reduced to approximately 150, using elements 
of Headquarters and Headquarters Battery C and D Batteries of 1st Battalion, 
101st Field Artillery. 

Troops were not committed at any time and were released on 9 November 1974. 
The operation required an expenditure of approximately $281,000.00 of Commonwealth 
funds . 

Early in 1975 plans were formulated to assist civil authorities in the 
safety aspect of Bicentennial activities scheduled in various cities and towns 
of the Commonwealth. By order of the Governor over 1000 Massachusetts Guardsmen 
were placed on State Active Duty to assist in traffic control, crowd control 
and medical support in Boston, Lexington and Concord. Concern for public 
safety was heightened by the scheduled visit of the President of the United States 
to the three locations and expected large crowds that were anticipated. A Quick 
Reaction Force of Guardsmen was emplaced at Hanscom Field, Bedford in the event 
back-up crowd control forces would be required. Helicopter support was provided 
so that elements of the force could be airlifted into Concord or Lexington in a 
matter of minutes. 



35 



All activities were completed without incidents or accidents of any 
consequence. Police officials were most complimentary of the appearance and 
professional manner in which traffic control and crowd control missions were 
completed. The support of elements of the 114th Medical Battalion was parti- 
cularly noteworthy. In the town of Concord a company of the Battalion rendered 
first aid and effected disposition of scores of persons that would have over- 
saturated medical facilities normally available to the town. 

Captain Robert L. Marr, Captain, Commanding, Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company selected The Adjutant General, Major General Vahan Vartanian, 
to be Chief Marshal of a National Bicentennial Parade in Boston on 19 April 1975, 

As Chief Marshal, The Adjutant General was responsible for planning all 
phases of this historic event as well as conducting the parade. Members of 
the DPST were deeply involved in this effort expanding many days and nights 
coordinating such a mammoth undertaking with the City of Boston, Boston 200, 
Boston Police, Boston Parks Department and other supporting agencies. HHD, MA 
ARNG was tasked with providing control personnel, radio equipment and transpor- 
tation. 

This extension planning and preparation culminated in a parade that was 
considered by the Boston Police Department to be one of the largest and best 
planned paradet in recent memory. It was undoubtedly also one of the most 
stirring and colorful of parades since in addition to all of the fine military 
and civilian elements participating historic units of colonial militia heritage 
came from throughout the country to participate. 

The remaining months of the fiscal year were devoted in part to initial 
planning to prepare for the possible employment of Massachusetts Guardsmen 
to assist police agencies in maintaining law and order and a safe environment 
for school children during Phase II Desegregation Busing ordered by the Federal 
Court for the school year beginning in September 1975. 

Selected units and personnel were ordered to State Active Duty for possible 
commitment in the City of Boston to achieve a Federal District Court Order di- 
recting the busing of school children to achieve racial balance in the public 
school system. 

Because of problems encountered in Phase I of the Federal Court Order and 
the anticipation of civil distrubances resulting from the implementation of 
Phase II of the Federal Court Order, frequent meetings between law enforcement 
agencies and key government officials were conducted. 

As a result of these meetings, on 7 September 1975 members of the 26th 
Military Police Company and the 685th Military Police Battalion were ordered to 
State Active Duty. The 26th MP Company was attached to the 685th MP Battalion 
and they initially assembled at Camp Curtis Guild, Reading, Massachusetts. 
Commander, 26th Infantry Division was designated as the Task Force Commander. 



36 



The possibility of the threat of "blue flu" and refusal of overtime 
within the Boston Police Department, caused the 685th MP Battalion and the 
26th MP Company to relocate from Camp Curtis Guild to the Fargo Building 
on Summer Street, South Boston. 

It also became apparent that additional National Guard troops would 
be needed to provide law enforcement assistance on a standby basis. 
Accordingly, the 1st Battalion, 101st Infantry, 26th Infantry Division was 
ordered to State Active Duty on 7 September 1975. The 1st Battalion, 101st 
Infantry occupied Camp Curtis Guild upon displacement of the 685th MP Battalion. 

Several guardsmen were struck by rocks and missiles thrown by unknown 
persons of the street crowd which gathered outside of the Fargo Building 
when Task Force elements were relocated thereon 7 September 1975. None of 
the injuries were considered serious. 

During the alert period, intensified civil disturbance training was 
conducted in riot control tactics. Television Trainers (TVT) were utilized 
extensively and effectively. State Police, FBI and the Defense Race Relations 
Institute personnel assisted in training Mass ARNG units. 

Since the Boston Schools opened with only minor disturbances and the 
threat of cc\e Bost-nn Police Department job actions never materialized, the 
1st Battalion 101st Infantry was released from State Active Duty on 12 September 
1975 and the remainder of the Task Force was released on 19 September 1975. 
No troops were committed "on the streets", other than local security at the 
Fargo Building, during the entire period of State Active Duty. The operation 
required an expenditure of approximately $425,000 of Commonwealth funds. 



"' I 



37 



INTELLIGENCE 



The Massachusetts National Guard does not have the authority either 
by Army Regulations or State statute to conduct overt or covert intelligence 
operations. However, because of its responsibility to provide military 
support to civil authorities, it must be kept abreast of current situations " 
throughout the Commonwealth which might result in the employment of National 
Guard units or personnel. Since 1967, close working relationships have 
been maintained with local, State and Federal law enforcement agencies. 
This has permitted the Military Division to be advised of conditions on a 
day-to-day basis which assists the National Guard in being prepared to meet 
its obligations under Sections 41 and 42, Chapter 33, General Laws, Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts. 

SECURITY 

During Fiscal Year 1975, major emphasis in this function was directed 
towards continued improvement of the physical security of weapons and 
ammunition. Techniques initiated in FY 75 include security clearances for 
personnel responsible for safeguarding these items, strict key control, in- 
creased safeguards in shipment of weapons and ammunition, improvements in 
intrusion detection systems and improvements to structural configuration of 
unit supply rooms. 

COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAMS 

The National Guard is deeply involved in community service and domestic 
action projects throughout the Commonwealth. During any particular month 
usually at unit level, there are several dozen different projects going on, 
from participation in local clean-up operations to repair of Little League 
baseball fields. 

Although military preparadness remains our principle objective, every 
Commander is encouraged to exercise his initiative and imagination to Involve 
the personnel under his command in local worthwhile projects to assist their 
neighbors. 

During FY 1975 The Massachusetts National Guard had the honor of having 
two entries selected by The Adjutant General's Association Awards Committee. 
One entry was in the youth activity category, this project involved more than 
5,000 guardsmen of the 26th Infantry Division who participated in and supported 
a walk for impoverished youth. Guardsmen laid out the route of march, dis- 
tributed posters, opened armories for registration, provided first aid stations 
and set up check points for the walkers. Proceeds of the march were donated 
to the Horizons for Youth Camp, Sharon, Massachusetts. 



38 



The other was a community service award winner, in which an open 
house was held for 7,500 citizens and a breakfast given for 300 businessmen 
and community leaders in Westfield, Massachusetts. The 104th Tactical 
Fighter Group provided volunteer guardsmen for youth programs, educational 
assistance and environmental concern. 

The following is a list of some of the more significant community - 
oriented projects; 



Salem Heritage Days 

Local Army and Air National Guard bands and personnel participated 
in the City of Salem's Heritage Days. Guard units provided personnel and 
equipment to assist the City of Salem in feeding 1200 people during the cele- 
bration of Heritage Days held on August 18, 1974. 

Construct Helicopter Pad - Falmouth Hospital 

Personnel and equipment provided by the 102nd Civil Engineering 
Flight, Air National Guard were used to construct a helicopter pad at the 
Falmouth Hospital to facilitate emergency landings. 

Medical Aid at W estfield Fair 

Men from the 104th Tactical Fighter Group located at Barnes 
Airport, Westfield, Massachusetts provided medical personnel with equipment 
to man first aid stations at the annual City of Westfield Fair. 

Wellington Yacht Club Inc. - Cookout for Underprivileged Children 



On 
Massachusetts 
under privile 
Massachusetts 
amusement rid 
Company 101st 
and military 
and personnel 



14 July 1974, the Mystic Wellington Yacht Club Inn of Medford, 
conducted a mammoth cookout and circus for approximately 500 

ged children from Father Gerald Hickey's Parish, Dorchester, 

This was an elaborate affair, with all types of entertainment, 

es for everyone, and unlimited quantities of food. Headquarters 
Engineer Battalion, Reading, Massachusetts, provided trucks 

busses for the event as well as cooks, medics and ambulances 
for crowd control. 



Charles River Clean-Up Campaign 

26th Infantry Division provided, equipment and men to support the 
Charles River clean-up campaign which is sponsored by the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict Commission annually. The 26th Infantry Division also participated in 
clean-up programs at the following locations; Hatch Shell - Boston, Magazine 
Beach - Cambridge, Watertown Yacht Club, Waltham Boy's Club, Newton MDC Sub- 
station, Town of Weston, Town of Needham, Town of Wellesley, Brighton - 
Soldier's Field Road, Boston Harbor Group. 



39 



State Police 

Massachusetts National Guard provided the use of Ayer armory 
plus the use of an Armored Personnel Carrier to support the Massachusetts 
State Police in their training program. The National Guard and State Police 
have cooperated in the loan of equipment such as mine detectors to locate 
stolen items such as hand guns. 

Light A Light for The Retarded 

On October 6, 1974, in Leominster a "Light A Light for The 
Retarded" day was held. Personnel from the 726th Maintenance Battalion 
participated in the program by utilizing more than 30 trucks to canvas the ^ 
city for attic-type items and treasures which were sold at a "Treasure Sale 
on the 19th of October 1974. 

Urban League of Springfield, Inc. 

Members of Company C, 181st Engineer Battalion working with 
engineer equipment to Include a dozer, front-end loader and several dump 
trucks leveled a burned out building to include taking remains of building 
to the dump. Unit members then turned their attention of covering the 
cellar hole so children attending summer camp at Camp Atwater, Brookfield 
would not fall into the cellar hole which was adjacent to a baseball field. 

Horizons for Youth 

October 20, 1974 the Massachusetts National Guard sponsored and 
participated in a "March for Disadvantaged Youth". Local National Guard 
armories throughout the state were used to support the march to include the 
following activities; plan and set-up the route of march, contact local 
schools, churches and other groups interested in marching or contributing to 
the march. Men from local units ran checkpoints, registration points, and 
first aid stations to make the march a well ran event. A very substantial 
amount of money was turned over to the organization's "Horizons for Youth 
Camp" by the National Guard. 

US Department of Agriculture - Food Stamp Project 

Units of the Massachusetts National Guard stationed in Pittsfield, 
Greenfield, Worcester and Leominster assisted the Food and Nutrition Service 
of the United States Department of Agriculture in signing up grocers in 
these local areas in the Federal Food Stamp Program. 

Easter Seal Campaign 

Massachusetts National Guard sponsored and conducted an Easter 
Seal Tel-A-Thon in conjunction with the Easter Seal Foundation Drive for 
funds. A substantial sum of money was pledged and received to assist/support 
community organizations during the year. 



40 



vtch 



Action for Boston Community Development Inc. (ABCD) 

Units of the Massachusetts National Guard participated in this 
program of collecting toys for needy children for Christmas. Local armories 
were used for depositing toys which later were transported to a central 
location for distribution by the ABCD Inc. 

Plum Island Sandbag Wall 

Guardsmen from the 101st Engineer Battalion reported on short 
notice to fill over one thousand sand bags for the Town of Newburyport, 
Massachusetts. The sand bags were used to build an eight foot high wall 
to prevent windswept ocean tides from innudating and destroying waterfront 
homes at Plum Island. 

Town of Bridgewater - Sanitary Land Fill 

Guardsmen and engineer equipment from Company A, 181st Engineer 
Battalion were requested by town officials of Bridgewater to help correct 
a health problem at the town's sanitary land fill. Men and equipment completed 
work in covering up and closing the dump in record time, thus preventing 
the problem from enlarging. 

Woburn Council of Social Concern, Inc. 



Guardsmen from the 101st Engineer Battalion worked along with the 
staff of the Woburn Council of Social Concern, Inc - digging and moving 
sand and gravel and constructing terraces - providing not only their strength 
and muscle power, but their expertise and advice in construction of a new 
playground. 

Faulkner Hospital - Hypertension Screening Program 

Guardsmen and equipment from the 114th Medical Battalion participated 
in conducting a free Hypertension Screening program with the Faulkner Hospital. 
(See attached sheets). In addition, in the fall the program is being expanded 
to include extra personnel and an additional van. In addition to hypertension, 
diabetic screening will be offered. Contact has been made with St. Elizabeth 
Hospital and Carney Hospital to determine their interest in this program. 
The Community Health Director of the Faulkner Hospital has volunteered to be 
the point of control between the Guard and the Boston Hospital to include 
Boston City Hospital for such programs. This program must be worked through 
the hospitals. 

In addition the 114th Medical Battalion will be involved in the 
movement of all patients from the Old Faulkner Hospital to the new Faulkner 
Hospital on a Saturday in March 1976. 



41 



Town of Dudley - Pine Street School 

Men and equipment from Company B, 181st Engineer Battalion 
knocked down and removed the town's old Pine Street School which no 
longer could be occupied. The engineers removed the building and land- 
scaped the area for a small mini-park. 

Boston Fire Department 

Guardsmen from 1/101 FA Battalion and 126th Signal Battalion 
set-up tents for the New England Veteran Fireman's League Muster held 
Saturday, September 28, 1974. The tents were to be used as canopies under 
which to serve meals in case of rain. 

Bicentennial Efforts at Concord and Lexington 

On 19th of April 1975 this nations' Bicentennial events started 
at Lexington and Concord. The Massachusetts National Guard was well represented 
at these locations with over 1000 members on duty providing logistical 
and security support to the towns. The National Guard also helped Federal 
and State agencies in crowd control and security for the Presidential visit. 
The National Guard was also requested to help set up aid stations, the 114th 
Medical Battalion set-up over 14 first aid stations with their well trained 
medical personnel to fill this request. 

Bicentennial Efforts Throughout the State 

The Massachusetts National Guard is presently helping various 
towns and cities thru the state with their bicentennial efforts. The guard 
has been on call to march, put on displays, set-up first aid stations, help 
feed people, move items and crowd control. 

Miscellaneous Community Projects 

Here is just a sampling of other projects during the FY 1975 in- 
volving Army and Air National Guardsmen and Guardswomen. Many projects are 
performed quietly in neighborhoods across the state, coming to the attention 
only of those directly involved. 

Loan of Water trailers to Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Towns and Cities 
as well as other worthwhile organizations. 

Loan of armories for social groups, boy scouts, girl scouts, and 
numerous groups for all types of reasons. 

Loan of Tentage. Local units throughout the state are requested 
to loan and put up tents for all types of events and groupd thru the summer 
and fall months . 



42 



Middleton Dump Fire 

Personnel from the 101st Engineer Battalion assisted the 
Massachusetts Civil Defense Agency and Middleton Fire Department in 
fighting a burning and smoldering land-fill fire which caused the 
Governor to declare an Air Pollution Incident Emergency. Four bull- 
dozers were used to cut a path through the burning debris to isolate 
the fire and then pushed it through a trench filled with water estin- 
guishing the fire. 

Salem Water Main Break 

Selected personnel and twenty-three water trailers were dis- 
patched to the Central Fire Station, Salem, Massachusetts to assist Area 
I Director of the Massachusetts Civil Defense Agency in supplying the City 
of Salem emergency water due to a water main break. 

Summer In The City "76" 

Personnel from the l/101st FA Battalion assisted the City of 
Lynn in installing a fence and also provided a tent for the Lynn Economic 
Opportunity cultural arts and recreation program. 

Pcnvers S tate Hospital 

The 1st Brigade, 26th (YANKEE) Infantry Division provided chairs, 
tables and tents to the Danvers State Hospital for a day camp for retarded 
children. 

Salute To Tall Ships 

Personnel from the l/211th FA Battalion provided a 105MM howitzer 
salute to Tall Ships coming to Provincetown Harbor for the purpose of commerating 
the 350th anniversary of the Town of Provincetown, Massachusetts. 

Faulkner Hospital 

Personnel from the 114th Medical Battalion assisted in transferring 
patients from the old hospital to the new hospital. In addition, numerous 
medical records and equipment was also moved. 

Massachusetts Hospital School For Crippled Children 

Personnel from the 101st Engineer Battalion cleared and graded a 
trail to be used as an environmental education trail system for handicapped 
and non-handicapped children. 



43 



Faulkner Hospital-Hypertension Screening Program 

Personnel and equipment from the 114th Medical Battalion parti- 
cipated in conducting a free Hypertension Screening program with the 
Faulkner Hospital. In addition, diabetic screening was offered. 

Haverhill "Festival 76" 

Personnel and equipment from the 1/102 FA Battalion conducted 
a 20 gun salute for the Haverhill Bicentennial Commission "Festival 76". 

Return Of Cannon To The Town of Montague 

Personnel and equipment from the 1058th Transportation Company 
transported an 8" gun from Letterkenny Depot, Pennsylvania to the Town of 
Montague, Massachusetts. In 1942, the Department of Defense notified the 
town of Montague that the one ton Australian cannon on display in front 
of the town hall was needed in the war effort and that it would be replaced 
at the end of World War II. 

Israeli Air Force Cadets 



The Massachusetts Air National- Guard hosted a on© day visit by 
Cadets of the I.craeli Air Force at Otis Air Force Base. A tour and briefing 
on Air National Guard operations was given. 

Boy Scout Jamboree 

The 114th Medical Battalion provided personnel, tents, ambulances 
and water trailers to the North Bay Council of Boy Scouts for their annual 
jamoboree. 

MDC Clean-Up Campaign 

Personnel and equipment from the 26th (YANKEE) Infantry Division 
participated in an MDC Clean-Up Campaign which involved the Blue Hills Re- 
servation, Trail Museum and Charles River. 

Department of Environmental Quality Engineering 

The 101st Engineer Battalion cleared and graded a parking lot and 
air sampling trailer site for the Department of Environmental Quality En- 
gineering. 

Easter Seal Fund Raising Campaign 

Guardpersons participated in a Easter Seal Fund Raising Campaign 
by collecting donations and also appearing on a television telethon on Channel 
56. 



44 



Cerebral Palsy of Greater Boston 

Personnel and equipment from the 101st Engineer Battalion 
assisted in various projects at Camp Sea Haven. It is a seashore camp 
for handicapped children. 

Water Trailer Assistance To Taunton 

The 26th (YANKEE) Infantry Division provided water trailers to 
Taunton, Massachusetts. The water supply was contaminated for an extensive 
period of time. 

Algonquin Council Boy Scouts 

150 canvas folding cots were provided to the Boy Scouts for 
their summer camp for a period of two (2) months. 

Northbridge Conservation Commission 

Personnel and equipment from the 101st Engineer Battalion cleared 
and graded a playground area and also covered over a stump disposal area. 

Plum Island Sandbag Wall 

Over 800 Guardsmen reported on short notice and filled over 
1,000 sandbags to erect an eight foot wall. 

Guatemala Earthquake 

Personnel from the 1/101 FA Battalion assisted in collecting relief 
supplies for the earthquake. These supplies were donated by various agencies 
throughout the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and are presently being stored at 
the National Guard Supply Depot, Natick, Massachusetts awaiting shipment to 
Guatemala. 

Governor's Jogger's Fair 

First Aid station was provided by 114th Medical Battalion, and water 
trailers provided by l/182nd Infantry for the Governor's Jogger's Fair on 
Boston Common. 

Holliston Conservation Commission 

Personnel from the 101st Engineer Battalion graded and widened a 
trail for fire apparatus for Holliston Conservation Commission. 



45 



Summer Music Youth Learning Experience (SMYLE) 

Personnel of the 215th Army Band developed a music learning pro- 
gram for youngsters in the southeastern part of Massachusetts. In addition 
to teaching youths how to play musical instruments, classes were given on 
arranging, etc.. The youths traveled throughout the State giving concerts. 



46 



£ llii 




Gov. Dukakis and the Commissioner of Public Safety confer with guard 
personnel during Phase II of court ordered busing. 




"Salute" to Massachusetts guardsmen is rendered by Boston's tactical 
police force for their assistance in the court ordered busing of Boston 
school children. 



vTtycjHfy' 




Medics check blood pressure. 




Medics of the Massachusetts Army National Guard assisting in the 
hypertention screening program of the Faulkner Hospital. 



■ 



'Mi&&X&i^&X5£&& 




Engineers finish a replica of the famous Washington/ Mclntire Arch on 
Salem Common as a part of the town's bicentennial celebration. 




Water was served to the thousands of spectators lining the harbor wait- 
ing to view the parade of tall ships in Boston. 







After loading an excess Coast Guard patrol boat aboard a flat bed 
trailer in Maine, guardsmen deliver the craft to its new owners for 
harbor patrol duty in Beverly, Mass. 






UTELS 



M fe*. 



^lTfl 




Armed Forces Day at Camp Edwards turned out many prospective tankers. 



l^^/^'f^^ 




With the help of the Massachusetts Army National Guard, a replacement 
cannon for one donated in 1942 for the war effort was returned from 
Philadelphia, Pa. to the town common of Montague, Mass. 



' 




CPT Sherman of the Massachusetts Army National Guard 1058 Trans. 
Co. hands over the keys to 3 million dollars worth of emergency water 
equipment that was delivered from Seneca, N. Y. to the Belchertown 
civil defense site. 






**■ 



\ J& 




Handicapped children enjoying a ride along the proposed site of a l'A 
mile nature trail to be built for them by guardsmen in Canton, Mass. 




Tlie transfer of patients from the old wing of the Faulkner Hospital to 
its newly constructed wing was a pleasant experience to many of the 
patients thanks to Massachusetts guardsmen. 




TJie Middleton dump fire burned for weeks until smoke weary residents 
called upon the Massachusetts Army National Guard. 




< '* :.-- * . v 



'.* v 



Guardsmen preparing to bury a whale washed ashore on Salisbury Beach 



i 




Engineers leaving Peddocks Island after participating in the harbor 
islands beautification program. 




Massachusetts guardsmen assisted the cities and towns of the Common- 
wealth in emergency snow removal operations. 




Musical accompaniment by Massachusetts cannoneers to Arthur Fielder's 
fourth of July presentation of the "1812 Overture. " 




Guardsmen participated in the Easter Seal Telethon of 1976, adding 
10,500 dollars to the fund. 



ARMY AVIATION 



The primary mission of Army Aviation elements of the MA AKNG is to 
augment the capability of 26th (YANKEE) Infantry Division in the conduct 
of tactical training and emergency support. 

During Fiscal Year 1975 Army Aviation in the MA ARNG reached its 
authorized density of equipment. A total of 13 UH-1 utility helicopters, 
28 OH-6 observation type helicopters, and 1 multi-engine, fixed wing, U8D 
command aircraft are located at the Army Aviation Support Facility at Otis 
Air Force Base, Massachusetts. 

The MA ARNG is authorized a total of 82 aviators and 36 crewmember/non- 
crewmember positions in 9 separate units or sections. At present all aviator 
positions are filled and 58% of all crewmember/non-crewmember positions are 
filled with qualified personnel. 

The MA ARNG Army Aviation Support Facility located at Otis Air Force 
Base, Massachusetts is adequate to support the aircraft/helicopter assets 
and the 9 separate aviation units/sections of the MA ARNG in all aspects of 
aviation orientated training and maintenance support. The facility is 
organized into two (2) major functional elements. The Training and Operations 
Section and the Logistical (Maintenance/Supply) Section. A total of 59 
technician positions are authorized at the Army Aviation Support Facility, of 
which 78% (46 technicians) are currently employed. 

During Fiscal Year 1975 a total of 3800 hours were flown by aviator 
personnel of the MA ARNG in various training and support missions. Various 
training programs have been conducted during the course of this Fiscal Year. 

The major program undertaken at the AASF has been to qualify all assigned 
aviators to fly helicopters under instrument flight conditions. Fifty-five 
percent (55%) of this program has been completed with a projected 95% completion 
by December 1975. Other programs include transition and standardization 
qualification of each assigned aviator, currency and proficiency training, 
and combat readiness flying minimum requirements. Current Department of Army 
Directives have implemented a new training requirement, Nap-of-the-Earth flying. 

During Fiscal Year 1976, Army Aviation in the MA ARNG increased in 
strength and equipment with the formation of a new non-divisional Medical De- 
tachment (Helicopter Ambulance) unit. With this increase, a new facility was 
established at Westover Air Force Base, Massachusetts in addition to the 
Otis Air Force Base, Massachusetts facility. 

The following shows the location of each facility and the units/sections 
assigned for purposes of aviation training and the numbers and types of 
helicopters assigned at each facility: 



47 



MA ARNG ARMY AVIATION SUPPORT FACILITY (MA ARNG AASF) OTIS AFB, MA 



UNITS /SECTIONS MA ARNG 



HHD 26th Avn Bn, 26th Inf Div 
Spt Co, 26th Avn Bn, 26th Inf Div 
HHC, 1st Bde, 26th Inf Div 
HHB, 26th Div Arty, 26th Inf Div 
Hq/A 726 Maint Bn, 26th Inf Div 
Co E (TAM) 726th Maint Bn,26th Inf 
Div 

Sub-Total 



UH-1 (UTILITY) 
HELICOPTER 


OH-6 (OBSERVATION) 
HELICOPTER 


None 

7 

2 
None 
None 


None 

6 

4 
14 
None 


1 


None 


10 


24 



Total 



34 



MA ARNG ARMY AVIATION FLIGHT ACTIVITY (MA ARNG AAFA) WESTOVER AFB, MA 



UNITS /SECTIONS MA ARNG 



UH-1 (UTILITY) 
HELICOPTER 



HHD, MA ARNG (nov; -divisional) None 

1059th Med Det(Hel Amb) (non-divisional) 6 

Hq/A 114th Med Bn, 26th Inf Div None 

HHC, 1st Bde, 26th Inf Div 2 



OH-6 (OBSERVATION) 
HELICOPTER 

None 
None 
None 
4 



Sub-Total 



Total 



8 



12 



In addition to the helicopters within the MA ARNG, two (2) U-8D multi- 
engine, fixed wing, command aircraft are in the MA ARNG inventory. This re- 
presents a total of 46 helicopters and 2 fixed wing aircraft with an approximate 
value of 9.5 million. 

Within the MA ARNG a total of 94 Officer/Warrant Officer aviators and 
60 Officer/Enlisted crew-members and non-crewmembers on flight status are 
authorized as follows : 

MA ARNG ARMY AVIATION SUPPORT FACILITY (MA ARNG AASF) OTIS AFB, MA 



UNITS /SECTIONS MA ARNG 

HHC, 26th Avn Bn, 26th Inf Div 
Spt Co, 26th Avn Bn, 26th Inf Div 
HHC, 1st Bde, 26th Inf Div 
HHB, 26th Div Arty, 26th Inf Div 
Hq/A 726th Maint Bn,26th Inf Div 
Co E(TAM) 726th Maint Bn,26th Inf 

Div 
Sub-Total 

Total 





WARRANT 




N0N- 


OFFICER 


OFFICER 


CREWMEMBER 


CREWMEMBER 


14 


None 


1 


2 


7 


19 


7 


6 


1 


7 


2 


1 


2 


13 


None 


12 


1 


None 


None 


1 


: 4 


2 


1 
11 


7 


29 


41 


29 



110 



48 



MA ARNG ARMY AVIATION FLIGHT ACTIVITY (MA ARNG AAFA) WESTOVER AFB, MA 



UNITS/SECTIONS MA ARNG 

HHD MA ARNG (non-divisional) 

1059th Med Det(Hel Amb) (non-divisional) 

Hq/A 114th Med Bn, 26th Inf Div 

HHC, 1st Bde, 26th Inf Div 

Sub-Total 

Total 



OFFICER 


WARRANT 
OFFICER 


CREWMEMBER 


NON- 
CREWMEMBER 


2 
.) 4 
None 
1 


None 

10 
None 
7 


1 

13 

1 

2 

17 


None 
2 

None 

1 


7 


17 


3 



44 



In addition to the 154 MA ARNG personnel on Flight Status, approximately 
375 non flying "Guardsmen" train at each of the facilities monthly. 

The organization to support the aviation assets of the MA ARNG is as 
follows : 



The 
Adjutant General's 
Office 
905 Commonwalth Ave 
Boston, MA 











Army Aviation 
Support Facility 

Bldg #2816 
Otis AFB, MA 






Army Aviation 
Flight Activity 

Bldg #7400 
Westover AFB, MA 







The State Aviation Officer (SAO) located at The Adjutant General's Office, 
serves as an extension of The Adjutant General. The SAO is responsible for 
formulation of policy and administration of the aviation program to include 
aircraft maintenance and exercises direct supervision of technicians engaged 
in aviation training and maintenance activities at each facility. 

The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is an installation established 
for centralized control, proper utilization and operation of the Aviation 
assets within the State. It is supervised by a technician commander and 
staffed with technicians for the purpose of conducting individual aviator 
proficiency flight training and maintenance of assigned aircraft. The facility 
is organized into two (2) major functional elements. The Training and Operations 
section and the Aircraft Maintenance Shop. A total of 54 technician positions 
are authorized at the AASF, of which, 83% (45 technicians) are currently employed 



49 



The Army Aviation Flight Activity (AAFA) is an installation established 
to supplement the AASF when geographically required. The functions and 
organizations of the AAFA are similar to that of the AASF, except in the 
maintenance area. The AAFA is not manned for direct support maintenance 
functions and is dependent upon the AASF for this support. At present, 
67% manning (12 technicians) of 18 authorized positions are filled. 

During Fiscal Year 1976 a total of 4,815 hours were flown by aviator 
personnel of the MA ARNG in various training and support missions. Emphasis 
was placed on qualification of all assigned MA ARNG aviators to fly heli- 
copters under instrument flight conditions during FY 76. At the close of 
the FY, 95% qualification was realized and continued emphasis is being 
placed on this training. Current Department of the Army directives have 
implemented a training requirement of Nap-of-the-Earth flying. A major 
program has been undertaken to develop and implement this training during 
FY 77. Because of the land area required, a site in conjunction with the 
Maine Army National Guard was selected and the first class will be conducted 
on October 1976. Projected completion of this program is FY 78. Other 
current training programs in the MA ARNG flying program includes transition 
and standardization qualification of each assigned aviator, currency and 
proficiency training, and combat readiness flying minimum requirements. 



I 

I 
I 

1 



50 



TRAINING & READINESS BRANCH 



Training and Readiness Branch is specifically responsible for: 

a. Develop and maintain the ARNG troop basis to include organizing 
and equipping units; assigning, attaching and detaching units, detachment 
and teams; and activating and inactivating units. Allocate and control 
military manpower authorizations to include TAADS reports and MTOE/MTDA 
changes . 

b. Formulate, maintain and supervise all aspects of ARNG training 
plans and programs including pertinent objectives and needs; development 
of general and detailed training plans and programs, including pertinent 
policies, directives, procedures and budgeting; and continuous training 
evaluation of subordinate commands. 

c. Evaluate training and make recommendations relative to improved 
use of training facilities; increased allocations for training time, and 
priorities in the distribution of equipment. 

d. Plan and prepare training tests and instructional material. Monitor 
and budget for, the procurement of training aids and instructional material. 

e. Coordinate, direct, and monitor special training programs such as 
affiliation, association, mutual support, marksmanship; civil disturbance 
training, ATAs, etc.. Prepare budget estimates/reviews as necessary and 
exercise management control of such funds made available. 

f. Manage the Army School Program; establish priorities for attendance 
of individuals at Army Service and special schools; manage school programs 
of field organizations. Prepare announcements regarding Army Service School 
Programs, including courses conducted by the various branch schools, Army 
Training Centers, and the USAR Schools System. Review all applications for 
service schools to ensure that the course prerequisites are met and that 
priorities for school training are followed. Prepare budget estimates/re- 
views as necessary and exercise management control of such funds made available 

g. Receive, edit and evaluate FORSTAT reports; AT evaluations; AT/ATA V 
plans and performance reports; and IDT Training evaluations. 

h. Develop the AT site and date schedule in coordination with other 
staff agencies, subordinate commands and higher authorities. 

i. Prepare, program and supervise Staff Training for HHD, MA ARNG. 

j. Exercise direct supervision of the training of all non-divisional 
units of the MA ARNG not attached to a subordinate major commander. 



51 



During FY 1975, the MA ARNG underwent a major reorganization which 
was directed by the Chief, National Guard Bureau. Capsulized, this re- 
organization eliminated from the MA ARNG troop list a Signal Battalion; 
Engineer Battalion; Field Artillery Battalion; four Company-size units; 
and four Medical detachments. The reorganization added one Engineer Company; 
one Military Police Company; and one Military Police Platoon. The purpose 
of this reorganization was to increase the training efficiency of the 26th 
(YANKEE) Infantry Division as well as realistically design authorized 
strengths with available manpower resources. 

INDIVIDUAL TRAINING 

Individual Training of members of the Army National Guard begins with 
their entry into the service and continues throughout their term of service 
through various educational methods available to them. 

REP-63 training is a period of active duty which Federal law requires 
each non-prior service enlistee to undergo and consists of basic combat 
and advanced individual training. During Fiscal Year 1975, 774 non-prior 
service enlisted men underwent this training. 

Additional educational opportunities are available through non-resident 
(extension) courses programmed by the various Active Army Service Schools. 
During Fiscal Year 1975, 750 Officers/Warrant Officers and 400 Enlisted Members 
of the Massachusetts Army National Guard participated in these courses. 

Furthermore, resident education is available to members of the Army 
National Guard by attending Active Army Service and Area Schools as well as 
conducted at unit level. 

The chart below indicates the attendance at such schools during FY 75 
as well as the Federal funds expended for pay, allowances and travel of stu- 
dents. 



TYPE OF SCHOOL 



NUMBER OF PERSONNEL 
ATTENDING 



TOTAL COSTS 



Army Service Schools 
Army Area Schools 
Local Unit Schools 



TOTALS 



171 

81 

1893 

2145 



$417,761 

98,278 

164, 020 

$690,059 



During Fiscal Year 1976, Officers/Warrant Officers and Enlisted Members 
of the Massachusetts Army National Guard participated in these courses. 

Furthermore, resident education is available to members of the Army 
National Guard by attending Active Army Service and Area Schools as well as 
schools conducted at unit level. 



52 



The chart below indicates the attendance at such schools during FY 76 as 
well as the Federal funds expended for pay, allowances and travel of stu- 
dents. 



TYPE OF SCHOOL 

Army Service Schools 
Local Unit Schools 



NUMBER OF PERSONNEL 
ATTENDING 

264 
1316 

TOTALS 1580 



TOTAL COSTS 

$684,092 
123,865 

$807,957 



UNIT TRAINING 

Unit training in the Massachusetts Army National Guard is conducted 
in accordance with policy, instructions and guidance furnished by Head- 
quarters, United States Forces Command (FORSCOM) and is under the general 
supervision of Headquarters, First United States Army (FUSA) . The Adjutant 
General is responsible for insuring that training is conducted within the 
guidance furnished by these headquarters to insure that readiness is in- 
creased and that pre-mobilization training objectives are achieved. 

Pre-mobilization training objectives and yearly training capabilities 
are established by FUSA for each unit. These objectives/capabilities are 
based on Army Training Programs (ATP) or Army Training & Evaluation Programs 
(ARTEP) and are expressed as Readiness Conditions (REDCON) C-l (Fully Ready) , 
C-2 (Substantially Ready), C-3 (Marginally Ready), or C-4 (Not Ready). The 
primary training mission of all units is to reach the established pre-mobiliza- 
tion objective so, if mobilized, the shortest possible time will be necessary 
before units can be deployed to combat zones. Generally, all MA ARNG company- 
size units have a pre-mobilization objective of C-2. 



The Training Year (TY) begins with the first training assembly after 
Annual Training (AT) and ends on the final day of AT the following year. 
TY is composed of two distinct phases - Inactive Duty Training (IDT and 
^Annual Training (AT). Beginning 1 October 1976, the Training Year (TY) and 
Fiscal Year (FY) will cover the same time frame, 1 Oct - 30 Sep. 

IDT consists of 48 training assemblies (each of 4 hours duration) and 
is usually conducted within the Commonwealth using such facilities as Fort 
Devens, Camp Edwards, and Camp Curtis Guild, as well as smaller facilities 
such as the Knightsville Dam, Douglas State Park and others. 



The 



53 



IDT is conducted outdoors, usually on weekends, during the period 
1 March through 15 November and indoors, at home armories, during the 
period 15 November through 28 February. The objective of IDT is to con- 
duct refresher training, develop and sustain team (section, squad and 
platoon) skills and to conduct other training required by Army Training 
Programs or Army Training and Evaluation Programs. 

Annual Training is the culmination of the training year and normally 
consists of 15 days of fulltime training at an Active Army installation with 
emphasis on company training, tactical realism and practical application. 
AT is designed to test, analyze and measure the combat readiness of each unit 
Each unit undergoes a constant evaluation during AT by an Active Army eval- 
uation team to determine its readiness and whether or not it has reached 
its yearly training capability. Each unit that reaches its pre-mobilization 
objective must undergo an Army Training Test (ATT) or Army Training & Evalu- 
ation Program (ARTEP) to verify such achievement and this is also evaluated 
by Active Army personnel. 



54 



A 



MASSACHUSETTS MILITARY ACADEMY 

Officer Candidate School and Non-Commissioned Officer Academy 

The OCS/NCOA Branch, DPST is directly responsible for the operational 
control of the Massachusetts Military Academy at the National Guard Training 
Center, Camp Curtis Guild, Reading, Massachusetts. 

Officer Candidate School 

The Massachusetts Military Academy has furnished commissioned officers 
for the Massachusetts Army National Guard since 30 August 1913. It is the 
oldest State-operated OCS in the United States, and on 11 January 1951, it 
became the first to be certified and accredited by the Chief, National Guard 
Bureau. The Massachusetts Military Academy became the model for other 
states that followed and now each State operates its own OCS. 

The mission of the Academy is to train selected members of the Massachusetts 
Army National Guard to accept the responsibilities of a commissioned officer. 
Its objective is to provide instruction, experience, and motivation to each 
cadet enrolled so that he will acquire the knowledge and qualities of leader- 
ship required of a commissioned officer and to develop in him a sense of duty, 
character, integrity, loyalty, and discipline. 

An Academic Board, established under the provisions of Section 19, Chapter 
33, General Laws, Commonwealth of Massachusetts and National Guard Regulation 
351-5, established the educational policies, courses of study, and standards 
of admission for the Academy. 

The United States Army Infantry School prepares, publishes, and distributes 
the prescribed OCS program of instruction of approximately 258 hours which 
closely parallels the resident OCS program. This instruction is given by the 
members of the OCS/NCOA Branch augmented by additional instructors from Army 
National Guard units throughout the Commonwealth. Candidates for the Academy 
are volunteers who must possess specified prerequisites and successfully pass 
an oral entrance examination conducted by a selection board appointed by the 
President of the Academic Board. 

Inactive Duty Training is conducted at the Massachusetts National Guard 
Training Center, Camp Curtis Guild, Reading, Massachusetts; Annual Training 
is conducted at Camp Edwards, Massachusetts. The training year covers a 
period of approximately 14 months and is divided into phases as indicated be- 
low: 

1. For the 1975 Graduating Class (#42): 



Guild) 



PHASE 1-15 days Annual Training (conducted at Camp Curtis 



Guild) 



PHASE II - 12 Weekend training assemblies (MUTA-4) 

PHASE III - 15 days Annual Training (conducted at Camp Curtis 



55 



2. For the 1976 Graduating Class (#43): 

PHASE 1-3 Weekend training assemblies (MUTA-4, concurrent with 
Class #42) 

PHASE II - 15 days Annual Training (concurrent with Class #42) 

PHASE III - 12 Weekend training assemblies (MUTA-4) 

PHASE IV - Completion of Active Army or Reserve Component Branch 
Officer Basic Course within one (1) year of graduation by attendance at the 
appropriate Service School. 

3. For the Current Class (#44): 

PHASE IA - 4 Weekend training assemblies (MUTA-4, concurrent with 
Class #43) 

PHASE IB - 15 days Annual Training (conducted at Camp Edwards) 

PHASE II - 12 Weekend training assemblies (MUTA-4) 

PHASE III - 15 days Annual Training (conducted at Camp Edwards) 

PHASE IV - Same as Class #43 

4. For the Entering Class in 1977 (#45): 

PHASE IA - 2 Weekend training assemblies (MUTA-4, concurrent with 
Class #44) 

PHASE IB - 15 days Annual Training (concurrent with Class #44) 

PHASE II - 12 Weekend training assemblies (MUTA-4) 

PHASE III - 15 days Annual Training 

PHASE IV - Same as Classes #43 and #44 

At the completion of Phase III of the training year, successful cadets 
are commissioned as Second Lieutenants and assigned to duty with a unit of 
the Massachusetts Army National Guard. 

A total of 77 cadets were initially enrolled in Class #42 — 53 were 
graduated and 50 were commissioned including 1 USAR student. 

Class #43 had an initial enrollment of 50 — 30 were graduated and 29 
were commissioned including 1 USAR student. 



56 



Class #44 had an initial enrollment of 77, including 5 USAR students 
and the first 2 female officer candidates in the history of the Academy. 
It is anticipated at this time that all of the present enrollment of 41 
Army National Guard male cadets, 2 Army : National Guard female cadets-, and 
4 United States Army male cadets wili be graduated and commissioned in 

July 1977. 

• .■■•-■.■•■■ 

An important facet of the Academy program is the recognition of out- 
standing cadets by presentation of awards for their accomplishments during 
the training year. These awards are made available in some cases by the 
generous support of donor organizations of whom we are most appreciative. 
The following awards are presented annually to graduates: 



AWARD & DONOR 



T A 

Leadership 

National" Guard Assn of Mass 



RECIPIENT, Class #42 

2LT A.J.EXARHOPOULOS 
Hq/Co A 726th Maint Bn 



3 LI a - 
RECIPIENT, Class #43 

2LT J.W. ERKKILA 
Co B, 1-182 Inf 



Academic 

Massachusetts National 
Lancers 



2LT M. HOFMANN 

Det 1, Co C 1-101 Inf 



2LT D.L. FARROW 

Co F 726th Maint Bn 



Drill ' &' Ceremony 2LTD.J. BARISANO 

LTG Otis M. Whitney (In Co C T-!8 2nd Inf 
memory of MAJ David J.White) 



2LT R.M.- THAYER * 
Co A 26th- S&T <Bh'' 



Achievement 

Military Order of Foreign 
Wars of the United States, 
Massachusetts Commandery 



2LT R. LAMOLY 
HHB, 1-101 FA 



2LT J.T. DENARO 
Spt Co 26th Avn Bn 



Field Leadership 
Association of the United 
States Army 



2LT A.J. EXARHOPOULOS 
Hq/Co A 726th Maint Bn 



2LT R.F.; ANNESE 
Co C, 114th Med- Bn 



Outstanding Class Contri- 
bution Massachusetts 
Military Academy Alumni 
Association 



2LT G.J. MULLEN 
Spt Co l-182nd Inf 



2LT J.L.- HARDEN 
Co B 126th Sig Bn 



Honor Graduate 
Ancient & Honorable 
Artillery Company of 
Massachusetts 



2LT M. HOFMANN 

Det 1, Co C 1-101 Inf 



2LT J.W.- ERKKILA 
Co B 1-132 Inf • 



Sergeants Award 
Sergeant of the 
Ancient & Honorable 
Artillery Company of 
Massachusetts 



2LT M. HOFMANN 

Det 1 Co C 1-101 Inf 



2LT J.W. ERKKILA 
Co B 1-182 Inf 



57 



1 



AWARD & DONOR 

Erickson Trophy 
National Guard Bureau 

Distinguished Graduates 



RECIPIENT, Class #42 

2LT M. HOFMANN 

Det 1 Co C 1-101 Inf 

N/A 



RECIPIENT, Class #43 

2LT J.W. ERKKILA 
Co B 1-182 Inf 

2LT D.L. FARROW" 

Co F 726th Maint Bn 



Commandant ' s List 



N/A 



2LT T.M. RYAN 
HHB 1-102 FA 

2LT J.W. MORRIS SEY 
Co E 726th Maint Bn 



2LT R.P. OPAROWSKI 
Co C 2-104 Inf 

2LT R.A. PERRY 

Co b 726th Maint Bn 

The list of Distinguished Graduates and the Commandant's List were 
initiated with Class //43. Criteria for all awards listed above and published 
in Massachusetts Military Academy Standing Operating Procedure 1-1, The Cadet 
Manual . 

Non-Commissioned Officer Academy 

In mid-1973, The Adjutant General, recognizing a need to provide 
quality education for non-commissioned officers, tasked the Academy with 
the additional responsibility of operating a Non-Commissioned Officer 
Academy at the Massachusetts National Guard Training Center, Camp Curtis 
Guild, Reading, Massachusetts. 

The mission of the NCO Academy is to provide leadership and instructor 
training to selected non-commissioned officers of the Massachusetts Army 
National Guard. Its objective is to increase the overall proficiency and 
effectiveness of the NCO Academy student. 

The program of instruction developed for the NCO Academy closely 
parallels that of its Active Army counterpart and is accredited by the Chief, 
National Guard Bureau. The conduct of the NCO Academy has assumed new importance 
with the impact of the new Enlisted Personnel Management System, implemented 
this year. 

Candidates for enrollment in the NCO Academy Basic Course are volunteers 
who must possess certain prerequisites and pass an oral examination conducted 
by local selection boards at the organization level. 



58 






Class //l of the NCO Academy was graduated on 22 June 1974, and this 
initial attempt was considered an unqualified success; 70 students were 
graduated. Due to an insufficient number of applicants, the NCO Academy 
was not conducted in FY 75. It is felt that the trauma and confusion of 
the major reorganization of the Massachusetts Army National Guard was 
the proximate cause for the lack of applicants. To illustrate the last 
statement, the initial enrollment of Class //2 was 220. Of the 173 students- 
who entered Phase I training at Camp Edwards, concurrently with the OCS on 
3 July 1976, 169 students including 10 enlisted women, successfully completed 
that phase and are expected to attend Phase II which will consist of 4 Week- 
end training assemblies (MUTA-4 in the Fall of 1976. 

The training year for the NCO Academy currently consists of two phases 
as indicated below: 

PHASE 1-15 days Annual Training (concurrently with OCS) 

PHASE II - 4 Weekend training assemblies (MUTA-4, concurrently with OCS) 

However, the conduct and phasing of the NCO Academy program is being 
seriously and exhaustively studied to determine alternative approaches 
which will serve the needs of the individual student and at the same time 
will meet the requirements of the Enlisted Personnel Management System, in 
the most efficient and expeditious manner. Current planning for the NCO 
Academy includes the conduct of a Basic Course, and Advanced Course, and a 
Senior Course in the future. 

An awards program has been established for outstanding students of the 
NCO Academy, the awards being donated by The Adjutant General of Massachusetts, 
as follows: Honor Graduate, Leadership, Academic, and Achievement. 

OCS/NCOA BRANCH, DPST 

The OCS/NCOA Branch recently underwent a restructuring of its organization 
along functional lines to improve its operations and the conduct of the Officer 
Candidate School and the NCO Academy. The success of this restructuring can 
not be measured until sufficient time has passed to allow for objective evalu- 
ation of the capabilities and performance against the needs and objectives 
of both the OCS and NCOA programs. Additionally, a program of self-help 
improvements to Academy facilities has been underway since May 1975, and is 
a continuing effort to provide the best possible facilities for OCS and NCO 
training in the Army National Guard. A visit to the Academy's facilities at 
Camp Curtis Guild discloses that improvements are steadily countinuing, al- 
though slowly, within the constraints of availability of funds and materials. 



59 



' Marksmanship Training 

FY 1976 provided further improvement in the State Rifle and Pistol 
Teams as well as increased interest in competitive marksmanship training 
at battalion level. 

The achievement of the State Rifle and Pistol Teams, as indicated 
below, is indicative of the dedication and desire of the team members. 
Support of these teams is provided by the Federal Government in the way 
of equipment and expense for national matches. Expenses for regional 
matches, generally are subsidized by State funds. 

Marksmanship Achievements FY 1976 

Pistol Team/ Individuals 



COMPETITION 



AWARD 



RECIPIENT 



Wilson Matches (NGB) 



First Place-Team 
Patton Match .45 
Cal Pistol Combat 



SSG Thomas Campbell 
SSG Robert Bein 
SGT Clifton Inman 
SP4 John Roblewski 
Co C 1/104 Inf 26 Div 
MA ARNG 



Second Place-Team SSG Thomas Campbell 
.45 Cal Pistol Match SSG Robert Bein 

SGT Clifton Inman 
SP4 John Roblewski 
Co C 1/104 Inf 26 Div 
MA ARNG 



Third Place-Team 
.45 Cal Combat 
Position 



SSG Thomas Campbell 
SSG Robert Bein 
SGT Clifton Inman 
SP4 John Roblewski 
Co C 1/104 Inf 26 Div 
MA ARNG 



First Place-Indi' 
vidual .45 Cal 
Pistol - Combat 



SSG Thomas Campbell 
Co C 1/104 Inf 26 Div 

MA ARNG 



First Army Area Combat Match First Place-Indi- 
vidual .45 Cal 
Pistol - Combat 



SSG Thomas Campbell 
Co C 1/104 Inf 26 Div 
MA ARNG 



Mass National Guard State 
Championships (Tri-Color) 



First Place-Indi- 
vidual .45 Cal 
Pistol - Military 
Rapid Fire 

First Place-Indi- 
vidual .45 Cal 
Pistol Combat 



SSG Thomas Campbell 
Co C 1/104 Inf 26 Div 
MA ARNG 



MAJ Paul Matthews 
HHD, MA ARNG 



60 



COMPETITION 



AWARD 



RECIPIENT 



New England National Guard 
Championships 



First Place (MKS) 
.22 Cal Pistol 
.45 Cal Pistol 



MAJ Paul Matthews 
HHD MA ARNG 



Angle Tree Stone-Regional 



RIFLE TEAM/ INDIVIDUALS 



Second Place Team 
.45 Cal Pistol 



DA Excellence in 
Competition Badge 



MAJ Paul Matthews 
HHD MA ARNG 
T/SGT Roy Piver 
102 Camron MA ANG 
T/SGT R. Seaknowski 
104 Tac Ftr Grp MA ANG 
T/SGT Donald Sprowl 
104 Tac Ftr Grp MA ANG 

MAJ Paul Matthews 
HHD, MA ARNG 



COMPETITION , 

Wilson Matches (NGB) 



Mass National Guard State 
Championships (Tri-Color) 



New Hampshire State 
Championships 



Keene NH Matches 



Nashua NH Regional 



AWARD 

First Place Excel 
in Competition 
2-3-600 Yd 
(New Match Record) 

First Place-Indi- 
vidual 200yd AGG 

Second Place-Indi- 
vidual 200yd AGG 

Second Place (Ex) 
200yd Slow Fire 

Third Place (Ex) 
200yd Rapid Fire 

First Place 300yd 
Slow Fire 

Third Place 200yd 
Rapid Fire 

First Place (Ex) 
600 yd Slow Fire 

Second Place (Ex) 
600 yd Slow Fire 
Second Match 



RECIPIENT 

CSM Donald Langille 
HQs 1/110 AR, MA ARNG 



CSM Donald Langille 
HQd 1/110 AR, MA ARNG 

SSG Anthony Cangeme 
HHD, MA ARNG 

SGT Robert Delsignore 
HQs 1/110 AR, MA ARNG 

SGT Robert Delsignore 
HQs 1/110 AR, MA ARNG 

CPT Robert Moultin 
HQs 26 Div, MA ARNG 

SGT Robert Delsignore 
HQs 1/110 AR, MA ARNG 

SGT Robert Delsignore 
HQs 1/110 AR, MA ARNG 

SGT Robert Delsignore 
HQs 1/110 AR, MA ARNG 



61 



COMPETITION 

Reading Long Range Match 



AWARD 



RECIPIENT 



First Place (UNC) SGT Ralph Imondi 

60 y d 26 Adm Co, 26 Div MA ARNG 

DA Distinguished CSM Donald Langille 

Rifle Shot Badge HQs 1/110 AR MA ARNG 



62 



Unit Awards Program 



The unit awards program for the Massachusetts Army National Guard 
was developed to recognize outstanding unit achievements and to foster 
morale and esprit. 



AWARD TITLE 



ACHIEVEMENT 



UNIT 



Knox Trophy (FA) 



Most Efficient Field Artillery Btry B, 1st Bn, 102 FA 



Sons of the Revolution 
Trophy 



Most Efficient Infantry 



Co B, 2-104 th Inf 



Armor Leadership 
Award 



Most Efficient Armor or 
Cavalry Unit 



HHT, 1st Sqdn, 26th Cav 



Eisenhower Trophy 



Most Outstanding Unit in the 
Mass ARNG 



HHC, 2nd Bn, 104th Inf 



Maintenance Award 



Unit with Most Efficient 
Maintenance Program 



HHB, 26th Inf Div Arty 



Superior Unit Awards 



Unit with Most Efficient 
Training 



HHC, 2nd Bn(Mech)104 Inf 



Pershing Trophy 



Most Efficient Unit in 
Marksmanship Firing 



Svc Btry, 1st Bn, 102 FA 



63 



CAMP EDWARDS 



History has continually demonstrated that the most valuable resource 
in any endeavor Is the caliber and competence of those engaged in making 
it a success. In 1775, the most important resource possessed by the Commonwealth 
and the Nation proved to be those dedicated citizen-soldiers who rallied to 
the cause of freedom, giving their time, effort, money, and even their lives 
to the preservation of liberty. They initially lacked sufficient training and 
therefore competence, but fortunately they got the job done. Throughout 
the intervening 200 years the citizen-soldier has continued to get the job 
done. Today's "Minutemen" are unique among the world's reserve forces in 
that they perform not only the increasingly critical function of back-up 
combat support for our severely diminished Armed Force, but simultaneously 
functions as an adjunct of civil authority. Preparation for these critically 
important functions cannot continue to be undertaken with casualness. 
Training, its caliber and scope, is of the utmost importance in providing to- 
days citizen-soldiers with the skills and knowledge necessary to the proper 
performance of the awesome tasks assigned. Other than the caliber and dedication 
of the men themselves, our most important asset become the effort we expand 
to insure their skill and competence in fulfilling their dual role. 

Forty years ago the Great and General Court of Massachusetts recognized 
the need for an adequate facility within the Commonwealth at which to train 
its National Guard troops. As a consequence, land was acquired and Camp 
Edwards was established at the entrance to Cape Cod. The Federal Government, 
through the Department of the Army, entered into a 99 years lease with the 
Commonwealth for use of the reservation prior to World War II and it was 
developed into an active Army post in time to assemble and train the 26th 
"Yankee" Infantry Division before its departure for Europe. In 1954, Congress 
authorized the transfer of the lease from the Department of the Army to the 
Department of the Air Force for the purpose of "operating a military airfield 
with supporting facilities". The establishment of Otis Air Force Base seriously 
reduced the amount of real estate available for the training of ground forces. 
Despite this fact, however, Camp Edwards was still of considerable value to 
the Massachusetts Army National Guard in that it was the only training area 
in New England adequate for weekend training of battalion and company size 
units and the only artillery firing range east of Fort Drum, New York. With 
the wide-scale cutbacks in defense spending and the elimination of many 
military installations across the country during the late 1960 - early 1970 
period, the Department of the Air Force decided to move its active Air Force 
units and supporting services out of Otis Air Force Base and turn over its 
air defense mission to the Massachusetts Air National Guard. Its planned 
withdrawal from Otis was scheduled for Mid-1973 and coincidental with that de- 
parture was a planned withdrawal of active army support from Camp Edwards. 



64 



J&& 



Learning of these plans in 1972, The Adjutant General of Massachusetts 
immediately initiated action to save Camp Edwards as a federally supported 
National Guard training site. The necessity for this action was two-fold; 
Camp Edwards is the only area in New England at which weekend training can 
be adequately conducted and it is impractical and financially impossible 
to conduct such training at Fort Drum, 350 miles away and without Federal ■ 
funding, the financial burden for operating and maintaining the Massachusetts 
Military Reservation would fall upon the Commonwealth. The need for the 
continued availability of Camp Edwards for National Guard and Reserve Component 
training was recognized and actively supported by the Department of the Army 
and the National Guard Bureau in Washington, D.C. However, since the Depart- 
ment of the Air Force and not the Department of the Army held control of the 
entire 20,000 acre Reservation, it was necessary to receive Air Force approval 
of all requested actions. There followed over two (2) years of frustrating 
negotiations. It is remarkable that sufficient progress was made to enable 
occupation of at least those facilities already being leased to the Active Army 

Upon takeover from the Army in February 1975 of what remained of Camp 
Edwards, the Guard found itself in control of 84 seriously deteriorated 
buildings, 22 firing ranges in need of repair, several neglected training 
areas and 6 fuel storage tanks. The task of reconstruction began and is 
continuing in an effort to provide the kind of facilities necessary to support 
the more comprehensive type of training needed by the modern Minutemen. A 
National Guard Training Site has the mission to provide training facilities for 
use by the National Guard, Reserve, Active Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine, 
Coast Guard, ROTC, and Research Organizations on contract to the Federal 
Government. There are eight (8) dormitories with a capacity for 216 enlisted 
men each, one dormitory that will house 106 officers on the top two floors 
and 30 female enlisted on the first floor, a BOQ that will house 33 officers, 
and a BEQ that will house 75 Non-Commissioned Officers. There are two con- 
solidated mess halls with the capability to feed up to 1500 personnel. 
Pre-World War II type wooden buildings utilized by units training at Camp 
Edwards as, command posts, supply rooms, and warehouses. There is a fairly 
new Post Theatre in the Vicinity of the Barracks, which it is hoped can be 
acquired. 

Since its acquisition in February 1975, Camp Edwards has provided 
training support to the Army National Guard of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, 
Connecticut, and New Hampshire; to the Regular Army Special Forces from Fort 
Devens; to the Seabees; to the Marine Corps Reserve; to the U.S. Army Reserve; 
to the Massachusetts State Police; to the Massachusetts Police K9 Group; 
to the Naval Reserve South Weymouth; and to the Air National Guard of Massachu- 
setts, Connecticut; New York, Alabama, and Pennsylvania. In FY 76 and FY 77 
two (2) DOD Test agencies, AVC0 and Hesse-Eastern both local Massachusetts 
firms, conducted tests on three of the ranges at Camp Edwards. In FY 77 
both M.I.T. and Raytheon conducted some DOD tests using the facilities at 
Camp Edwards. 



65 



Of Significant importance, the increases shown in manday utilization 
for FY 76 and FY 77, over previous years is marked, thereby indicating 
the recognized need for this facility. In FY 72, 115,00 mandays ; in FY 73, 
90,000 mandays; in FY 74, 185,000 mandays (due primarily to the gas ^shortage 
preventing many units from attending AT at Fort Drum); in FY 75, 
mandays; in FY 76, 225,000 mandays. 



135,000 



Camp Edwards continues to respond to the needs of other state agencies 
and the civilian community. On 9 August during the hurricane alert, Camp 
Edwards housed 150 civilian personnel evacuated by the Forestry Service and 
Civil Defense Officials from nearby camping sites. Camp Edwards personnel 
worked throughout the night escorting evacuees to the dormitory and issuing 
bedding as needed. Throughout the year Camp Edwards has supported the Youth 
Groups working with disadvantaged youth, to include the Boy Scouts, the 
Cambridge Youth Group, and shortly the Youth Forestry Group. 

During FY 76 Camp Edwards employed 3 Federal Technicians, 12 Temporary 
Federal Technicians, and 12 contract hire personnel, with a payroll of about 
$155,000. During FY 77 employment rose to five full time federal technicians, 
eighteen temporary technicians the majority of whom work on range maintenance, 
ten full time service contract employees, twenty part-time service contract 
employees with the majority of whom work in the repair and utility section. 
There are fortv-one personnel employed under the Economic Development Act, 
Title 10, developing existing five breaks and access roads. Twenty full-time 
federal technicians are employed at the UTES site. Two majors, two captains, 
and six enlisted personnel were on a full time training duty status from 
thirty to eighty-nine days. The 102d Area Headquarters assigned teams to 
Headquarters, Camp Edwards during Annual Training and Inactive Duty Training. 
The Federal payroll for the above mentioned personnel was over $733 .,042. 

Camp Edwards continues to be an important economic factor to the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, especially to the Cape Cod Community. During 
this Fiscal Year over $29,000 of Federal Money was spent with the local mer- 
chants on local purchase items that could not be obtained through normal 
supply channels. 

Besides the salaries paid by Federal Funds, expenditures for utilities, 
supply and rentals totalling $317,000.00, a Fiscal Year transition period 
of $114,000.00 and Title 10 funds of $100,000.00 for rental of equipment 
was all federally funded. A total of some $1,064,000.00 of Federal Funds 
was generated in the Commonwealth through Camp Edwards. 

It is fortunate indeed, that we were able to reacquire Camp Edwards 
and now possess the capability of providing increased and improved training 
to our new "Minutemen" through a wider range of facilities here at home. We 
are doubly blessed in that we can simultaneously provide more federally funded 
jobs for our citizens and substantially increase the amount of cash flow 
within the Commonwealth. In the 200 years since the original Guard fought to 
establish our country, in the 40 years that have elapsed since Camp Edwards 
was originally acquired to provide needed training facility support for the 
Guard, we have come full circle. The need still exists, but now, Camp Edwards 
exists - for the Guard, for the Commonwealth, for the Nation. 



66 



ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE DIVISION 

Administration of the Military Division, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
is directed by the Assistant Adjutant General for Administration with an 
authorized force of 217 State employees. The mission is to provide the fol- 
lowing services to elements of the Military Division: 

- Publications Management 

- Commercial Communications 

- Receipt and Dispatch of Mail 

- Maintenance of Central Files 

- Reproduction Facilities 

- Records Holding Area 

- Central Library 

- Claims Processing 

- Inspector General Functions 

- War Records 

- Unit Funds Audit 

- Budget Management, State Funds 

Approximately 25 of the authorized positions remain unfilled because of 
funding limitations. 

Expenditure of State Funds in the amount of $3,272,187.00 was author- 
ized in FY 75. In FY 76 $2,740,994.00 was authorized. 



Schedule of Expenditures 

Administration and Maintenance 
State Uniform Allowance 
Special Duty (State Active Duty) 
Unit Fund Allowances 
Accident and Damage Claims 
War Records Section 
Administration-State Quartermaster 
Armories-Operation and Maintenance 
Rifle Range-Operation and Maintenance 
Maintenance of Storage Facilities 
Maintenance of Aviation Facility 
Spanish War Benefits 
Military Reservation Costs 



FY 75 



FY 76 



$441,328 


$457,900 


* 


63,924 


400,171 


120,387 


169,120 


144,336 


14,000 


16,000 


84,727 


74,439 


7,350 


6,643 


1,697,112 


1,558,493 


59,975 


66,269 


244,269 


233,100 


71,267 


78,650 


1,500 


1,350 


1,500 





$3,272,187.00 $2,740,994.00 



Schedule of Receipts 

Armory Rentals 

Rental - Camp Edwards Lease 

Sales 

Other Rentals 

Miscellaneous 



FY 75 



79,924 



FY 76 



$76,113 


$106,982 


1,943 




289 


10,206 


154 


656 


1,425 


2,293 



120,137 



^Payment of Uniform Allowances was discontinued in FY 76 



67 



SUPPLY AND SERVICES DIVISION 
U.S. PROPERTY & FISCAL OFFICE 



The USPFO activity is under the supervision of the United States 
Property & Fiscal Officer. Organization of the activity is shown below: 





US 






Property 






& 






Fiscal 






Officer 








•■""••■"■■- 


Assigned for Accounting 






























Publica- 




Construc- 












tions 




tion 






Asst 






Manage- 




and 






USPFOs 
(Air) 






ment 




Facilities 






Admi 
trs 


.nis- 
ition 


1 


Examine 


ation. 






Auto 
tic 


ma- 


Purchasing 
& 
















Data Pro- 


Contracting 
















cessing 


1 




Comp 


i— 




Logis 


Jtics 






troller 




Division 






Divis 


ion 
















Fis 


cal 




Mild 


.tary 








Stora 


ige 






Budget 




Accounting 




and 
Technician 
Pay 


Stock 
Control 


[ 


and 
)istribution 


Traffic 



68 



GENERAL 



The US Property and Fiscal Officer, an Active Army Officer, is 
responsible both to the National Guard Bureau of the Departments of the Army 
and Air Force, and to The Adjutant General for the proper obligating, accounting, 
reporting, financial planning, and administrative control of all federal funds 
allocated to the Massachusetts National Guard, Army and Air, and for the storage 
distribution, accounting and turn- in of all federal supplies and equipment 
furnished to the Massachusetts National Guard. 

The USPFO, located at 143 Speen Street, Natick, Massachusetts with sub- 
activities at Fort Devens, Otis Air Force Base, Camp Edwards, and Barnes Air 
National Guard Base, has an authorized manning of 107 technician spaces as of 
1 July 1975, with 7 additional spaces temporarily authorized in connection 
with reduction- in-force procedures. 

Federal funds, which comprise 94.6% of the total expenditures for the 
Massachusetts National Guard, are used for the operation, transportation and 
maintenance of federal equipment; pay, allowances and transportation of National 
Guard personnel, including full-time technician personnel (except when on state 
active-duty) ; procurement of rations and other necessary supplies and equipment 
on a contractual basis; military construction; operation of certain bases and 
camps . 

During Fiscal Years 1975 and 1976 federal funds totalling approximately 
100 million dollars were allotted to the Massachusetts National Guard, Army and 
Air, for the purposes and in the amounts shown on the following pages. 

BUDGET BRANCH 

The USPFO recommends to The Adjutant General an annual financial plan for 
utilization of federal funds. The Budget Branch makes budget requests and 
monthly reports, and conducts quarterly reviews with the various Program Managers 
It initiates budget requests, monthly reports, and prepares quarterly reviews. 
The branch continually analyzes status of obligations to determine trends and 
advises management when and where adjustments are required. 

FISCAL BRANCH 

This branch maintains records pertaining to the status of Federal funds 
to include obligations and disbursements of funds, assuring correctness of 
vouchers and necessary follow up and filing of vouchers after disbursement. This 
branch also allocates funds to the Air National Guard bases after receipt from 
the National Guard Bureau. Records are maintained for the current Fiscal Year 
and also two prior years, to include reports of allotments, status of allotment 
by projects, commitments, obligations, disbursements, expenditures, expenditure 
refunds, collections and adjustments, military pay and per diem payments. 



69 



EXPENDITURE OF FEDERAL FUNDS 
MASSACHUSETTS NATIONAL GUARD FY 1975 

$50,4 91,720 



ANNUAL 
TRAINING 
PAY 15 
days per 
year 

387,504 



INACTIVE 
DUTY TRAINING 
PAY 48 Drill per 
Year 

$15,029,434 




PAY-CIVILIAN 
PERSONNEL 

$23,308,171 



RECRUITING 
$600,915 



ALL OTHERS 
$1,148,574 



SUPPLIES & 
EQUIPMENT 

$4,357,557 



SERVICE SCHODLS AND 
SPECIAL TOURS 

$1,127,320 



REPAIRS /UTILITIES/CONSTRUC- 
TION 

$ 2,532,245 



70 



EXPENDITURE OF FEDERAL FUNDS 
MASSACHUSETTS NATIONAL GUARD FY 1976 

$48,852,500 



ANNUAL TRAI 

ING PAY 
15 Days 
per drill 



$ 6,074,000 



INACTIVE DUTY 
TRAINING PAY 
48 Drills per 
year 

$12,658,000 




PAY-CIVILIAN 
PERSONNEL 



$21,061,000 



SUPPLIES & EQUIP- 
MENT 
$3,458,000 



SERVICE SCHOOLS & 

SPECIAL TOURS 
$1,258,000 



REP/UTILITIES/CONSTRUC- 
TION 
$930,000 



RECRUITING 
$670,000 



ALL OTHERS 
$1,424,500 



OPN/MAINT AGREEMENTS 
$1, 319,000 



71 



MILITARY AND TECHNICIAN PAY BRANCH 

This branch is responsible for preparing bi-weekly payrolls for full-time 
Army National Guard technicians, and for maintaining records on retirement, 
insurance, health benefit, and leave, as well as reports required by the 
National Guard Bureau, Civil Service Commission and State Retirement Roard, 
During FY 1975, Army National Guard technicians purchased through payroll ded- 
uctions $184,213.33 in Savings Bonds, paid $134,246.55 to two (2) insurance 
programs, and contributed $210,294.48 to the State Retirement Program, It 
should be noted that the Federal Government contributed $291,518.05 to the 
State Retirement Fund for these employees. For the period 1976 Employee con- 
tribution to State Retirement System, $191,736.00 Federal Government contribution 
to State Retirement System, $302,214, Employee Savings Bond Program $131,352.00, 
Employee Insurance Plan $191,779.00. 

In FY 1975, this branch was expanded in size and given the additional re- 
sponsibility of paying all Army National Guardsmen on a once-a-month basis 
under the JUMPS-RC Program (Joint Uniform Military Pay System - Reserve Components) , 
as is done in the active forces, rather than by the traditional quarterly payrolls. 
The JUMPS-RC program presently covers Inactive-Duty Training Assemblies and will 
eventually include field training and all other federally-paid duty. The first 
monthly payments began in September 1975 for training assemblies conducted in 
July 1975. 

LOGISTCS 

The Logistics Division, under the supervision of the Supply Management 
Officer, is organized to include Inventory Management Branch, Storage and Dis- 
tribution Branch, Transportation Branch, Repair Parts Center and Service Stock 
Account for Clothing. 

The status of selected items of mission-essential equipment in the hands of 
units of the Massachusetts Army National Guard is as follows: 



FY 75 



FY 76 



Aircraft, Fixed Wing 

Aircraft, Rotary Wing 

Revolver, Cal .38 

Rifle, small 

Machine guns 

Howitzers, towed 

Armored Vehicles 

Turcks , 1/4 ton 

Truck, 3/4 to 2 1/2 ton 

Truck, 5 and 10 ton 

Trailers, cargo 

Semi-trailer, all types 

Engineer Construction equipment 

Radio Set 

Generator Set, Trailer Mounted 



1 

39 

136 

12,131 

831 

54 

88 

877 

1,538 

354 

1,688 

108 

62 

1,757 

55 



2 

45 

142 

11,265 

1,103 

58 

111 

766 

1,153 

132 

1,450 

132 

114 

1,488 

173 



72 



In addition, special equipment provided by separate funding from Military- 
Support to Civil Authorities allowances is made available for troop use in 
civil disturbances. 



FY 75 



FY 76 



I 



Batons 

Face Shields 

Body Armor, Fragmentation 

Disperser, Riot Control 

Shotguns 

Sniper Rifles 



1,739 
3,077 
3,748 

91 
273 

71 



4,490 
3,490 
3,841 

99 
301 

71 



Generally speaking, major equipment items and repair parts are issued to and 
turned in by units at the Fort Devens sub-activity. Other supply items, in- 
cluding clothing, are drawn from or turned in to the Natick warehouse by full- 
time unit personnel on a regular five-week schedule. Beginning in FY 1975, in 
order to exercise battalion supply sections during weekend training as well as 
personnel of the Supply and Transportation Battalion, the Natick Warehouse 
was opened for issue on Saturdays. During this period a total of 731 items were 
moved by REDFRAM (Readiness From Distribution of Army Material) Program messages 
from NGB, 651 items were transferred out to other States and 80 items were re- 
ceived by Massachusetts. Of the 731 total items moved, 452 were wheel vehicles. 

TRANSPORTATION 

During this period a total of 152 transportation requests were issued for 
movement of personnel to and from Annual Training Sites. Travel was arranged 
by commercial carriers, either airlines or bus, at a total cost of $358,711. 
Approximately 685 tons of supplies and equipment was shipped out and incoming 
shipments of 1,832 tons were received. Total shipment costs of approximately 
$121,102 were obligated from funds allotted to this State. An additional 922 
tons, incoming and outgoing, were funded by other agencies. 

PURCHASING AND CONTRACTING BRANCH 

The daily operation of this branch includes the purchasing of all fuel for 
the Mass ARNG; procurement of subsistence; procurement of supplies and services, 
not available from Government channels; and administering supply, service, and 
construction type contracts primarily for the Mass ANG. 

During the year this branch expended $344,000.00 for the purchase of fuel 
for the operation of the Mass ARNG. The branch also expended $92,000.00 for 
the purchase of miscellaneous supplies and services to include office supplies, 
rental of office equipment, and procurement of publications required for the 
operation of the Mass ARNG. The branch also administered the following contracts 
at our Air National Guard bases at Barnes Airport, West field, Mass., ANG Base, 
Worcester, Mass., ANG Base, Wellesley, Mass., and Otis AFB, Falmouth, Mass. - 
Supply $37,500.00; Services $35,600.00; Architect/Engineer $40,800.00; and 
Construction $2,192,560.00. During the period of 1976, procurement has expended 
$350,000 for fuel. The branch also administered the following contracts at our Air 
National Guard bases at Barnes airport, Westfield, MA, ANG Base, Worcester, MA, 
AN6 Base, Wellesley, MA, Otis AFB, Falmouth, MA. 



73 



Supply Contracts 

Service Contracts 

Architect and Engineer Contracts 

Contruction Contracts 



FY 75 

$37,500.00 

35,600.00 

40,800.00 

2,192,560.00 



FY 76 







59,950.00 
13,300.00' 
1,729,738.00 



DATA PROCESSING 

The Data Processing Center assumes the role of a service organization, 
supporting the mission of the United States Property and Fiscal Officer and 
The Adjutant General, Massachusetts. 

Utilizing an IBM 1401 Computer with 6 Magnetic tape drives and peripheral 
punched card equipment, the Data Processing Center creates and maintains data 
files to support day-to-day operations and requirement imposed by The Adjutant 
General, and National Guard Bureau. 

During Fiscal Year 1975, the Data Processing Center underwent a major 
conversion from an IBM 360/20 card system to the present IBM 1401 Magnetic tape 
system. There are currently a total of 392 NGB standard programs and some 
43 local programs fully operational. 

The major areas covered by these computer programs are Inventory and 
Stock Control, Military Personnel data, JUMPS (RC) , Technician Payroll and 
Budget and Fiscal Accounting. This year one of the largest undertakings 
for the Data Processing Center was the establishment of the JUMPS-RC Data 
Base. The Data Base contains information on over 11,300 Guard members. This 
file was transmitted to and established at Fort Benjamin Harrison with an 
accuracy of 99.8+%, one of the lowest error rates recorded for an individual 
state. 

Due to the increase in requirements and in order to meet suspense dates, 
the Data Processing Center in September 1974 started to operate a second shift 
on a permanent basis and this has continued thru 1976. Numerous new computer 
programs have been added during 76 period. 

EXAMINER BRANCH 

The mission of the Examiner Branch is to perform annual examinations 
of accounts between the United States Property and Fiscal Office and the re- 
sponsible officers entrusted with Federal property and to conduct internal re- 
views within the office of the USPFO. In addition to reviewing accounting re- 
cords, making corrections when required, conducting inventories of property, 
evaluating the application of regulations and directives, a review is made of 
the last State and Federal Annual General Inspections to insure compliance with 
reported items. During this reporting period 67 annual and special audits were 
completed, and up to 1 November 1976,65 annual and special audits were completed. 



74 



AIR NATIONAL GUARD 



The USPFO has three Assistant USPFOs (fiscal, logistics, and real pro- 
perty) located at Air National Guard facilities at Otis AFB (also serving 
Wellesley ANG Base) and three more at Barnes ANG Base (also serving Worcester 
ANG Base) . The Assistant USPFOs provide services for the Air National Guard 
similar to those outlined above for the Army National Guard, but using Air 
Force accounting and supply systems. 



75 



PROGRAM 

DEVELOPMENT 
OFFICE 

(MAAR ) 









RESOURCES 




BUDGET 


ANALYSIS 




ANALYSIS 

• 



76 



w 



I 

I 
I 



PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 



The Program Development Office is responsible for developing and 
maintaining a long range (three (3) year) program system designed to in- 
sure maximum utilization of resources to achieve optimum effectiveness 
of State programs and objectives. This includes analysis and display 
of programs and resources for the appropriate out-year. 

The Program Development Office will accomplish the following Re- 
source Analysis functions: 

(1) Analyze issues affecting the allocation of resources, including 
the restrictions imposed by budgetary limitations. 

(2) Determine the most effective use of manpower resources to achieve 
desired goals and objectives. 

(3) Conduct management and special studies and analysis as directed 
by The Adjutant General. 

(4) Recommend organizational policy and administer a management im- 
provement program. 

(5) Provide advice on special command relationships. 

(6) Develop and coordinate installation improvement programs and 
assist in the implementation of installation area support activities 
and programs . 

The Program Development Office will accomplish the following Budget 
Analysis functions: 

(1) Perform analysis to assist in the preparation and publication of 
the State three (3) year program. 

(2) Analyze budget data to provide timely identification of potential 
issues and the means of optimizing resources available to The 
Adjutant General. 

(3) Analyze program decisions and budget decisions to determine issues 
impacting on the allocation of state resources so that potential 
mission-program conflicts may be resolved in a timely manner. 

(4) Recommend necessary changes or reallocation of budget resources to 
insure accomplishment of program objectives. 



77 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS 



FY 1975. No Division legislation was passed except Ch 533, approved 
21 August 1975, authorizing the Armory Commission to convey a small parcel 
of armory land in Worcester to the city. Further, no capital outlay funds 
were authorized. 

FY 1976. 

a. No Division legislation was passed. Fortunately however, some pro- 
posed Bills, initiated by others adversely affecting National Guard training, 
were also defeated. Further, no capital outlay funds were authorized. 

b. A most important change has been noted in the organization of a 
Legislative Committee of the Massachusetts National Guard Association. It 
has coordinated the establishment of Legislative Area Representatives for 
orienting area Legislators on National Guard Bills. Full liaison was kept 
with representatives of the Union, Massachusetts National Guard Enlisted 
Association and interested individuals. 

c. Future Committee plans provide for the following: 

(1) A thorough analysis of current legislative operations. 

(2) Full prior consultation with all interested groups and individuals, 
to include appropriate Legislators. 



(3) Appropriate orientation program changes. 



78 






SELECTIVE SERVICE SECTION 



During the Fiscal Year 1975 and 1976, the role of the National Guard 
Selective Service Section underwent drastic alteration by administrative 
action by National Selective Service Headquarters concerning the day-to-day 
registration of eighteen year-old men. Despite the conversion to the "All - 
Volunteer" Army, every eighteen year-old man Is still required by law to re- 
gister with the Selective Service System. The change in mission of the 
Selective Service Section of the Massachusetts Army National Guard reflects 
the overall change in the Selective Service System. Consequently, the 
section was called upon to formulate and forward to National Headquarters 
suggestions as to how most efficiently to accomplish registration on a 
once-a-year basis. 

In addition the section engaged in a number of activities in support of 
National Headquarters priorities: 

a. All members of the section participated in a training program - - as 
directed by National Headquarters - - to insure that each officer received a 
comprehensive background in current changes in Selective Service regulations 
and policy. 

b. In the month of December 1974, the section participated in a Mobiliza- 
tion Readiness Exercise, This experience gave all members renewed insight 
into the responsibilities and duties involved if a national emergency required 
them to assume the mission of the State Headquarters Selective Service System. 

c. The section provided the necessary logistical and planning support 
for the pick-up and transfer to the National Archives of Selective Service 
records that had been retired by directive of National Headquarters. 

All officers in the section completed tours of active duty either at National, 
Regional, or State Headquarters. This training provided increased insight 
into the needs of Selective Service in the event of a national emergency. The 
training was particularly important because of the increased reliance by 
National Headquarters on the National Guard and Reserve sections brought about 
by budgetary cuts in Selective Service civilian personnel. 

The Selective Service Section of the Headquarters and Headquarters Detach- 
ment, Massachusetts Army National Guard, is authorized 7 Officers and 3 Warrant 
Officers. The section is presently short 1 Officer. 



79 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE GUARD 



The State Guard continued its major effort to constitute a valuable 
auxiliary to the Massachusetts National Guard by supporting vital programs 
of Recruiting and Retention, Community Action, Civil Defense, and initial 
planning for a Massachusetts National Guard Military Museum. All activities' 
were conducted with appropriate coordination and liaison through the Public 
Affairs and Plans, Security and Training Division. 

1. Support of Recruiting and Retention was effected by: 

a. Providing speakers to civic groups, clubs and organizations. 

b. Providing outlets for publicity materials at civilian schools, car- 
washes, clubs, etc.. 

c. Visiting and discussing National Guard service with High and Vocational 
Schools guidance personnel and career job centers. 

d. Discussions with individuals and/or their parents. 

e. Supporting legislation to enhance National Guard service by improving 
minimum pay and allowance provisions and establishing educational benefits for 
membership. 

2. Support of the Community Action Program was effected by: 

a. Participation in the Public Information program to make individuals 
aware of the Guard's record of providing immediate help to communities in 
emergency situations such as the Chelsea Fire, Phase II, Desegregation, 
Middleton Dump Fire, whale pollution at Salisbury Beach, movement of hospital 
patients, etc. . 

b. Participation in numerous social service agency fund drives: Easter 
Seals, Horizons for Youth, etc.. 

c. Answering individual queries from retired personnel and next of kin 
pertaining to burial expenses, medals, retirement processing, etc. 

d. Supporting the National Guard Museum In Washington, DC, and Old Iron- 
sides Fund Drive. 

3. Support of the Civil Defense Program was effected significantly by: 

a. Reviewing appropriate plans. 

b. Visiting CD Headquarters for formal and informal orientations, tours 
and discussions. 

c. Visiting selected local CD centers for similar orientations, tours and 
discussions. 



80 



d. Attending planning sessions. 

4. Supported National Guard Museum planning by: 

a. Visiting closed armories to provide for an orderly and complete 
plan to properly safeguard intrinsic historical items of value. 

b. Surveying possible museum sites. 

c. Contacting groups, individuals and other historical societies for 
expertise. 

d. Collecting suitable memorabilia items for exhibit when museum is 
established. 

5. With respect to State Guard organizations and functions, the following 
major actions took place: 

a. A recruiting program to increase strength by 50 enlisted personnel 
was initiated. 

b. Selection National Guard training and security sessions were attended. 

c. Guest speakers were provided for staff on current presentations to 
State Guard personnel on such current personnel, security, operations, supply, 
Civil Defense and community relations. 

d. A review and anlysis of last years activities was conducted and a 
progressive training program for FY 1977 was developed. 

e. Tours of military installations were made for orientation purposes 
and for evaluation of present and future capabilities. 

f. Selected guest speakers scheduled various subjects such as the UN 

in the Mid East, Southeast Asia after Vietnam and current Special Forces roles 
and missions. 

6. Roster of personnel - attached. Major General Raymond A. Wilkinson was 
placed on the State Retired List effective 30 March 1976 after almost four (4) 
years of distinguished volunteer service serving as Commander since 29 September 
1972. He was succeeded as Commander by Brigadier General Richard F. Zeoli, 
Deputy Commander, who was subsequently promoted to Major General on 14 July 1976. 
Pertinent orders issued during this period are: 

Mass SO 133, Para 13, dtd 2 July 1974 

Mass SO 178, Para 1 & 2, dtd 30 Aug 1974 

Mass SO 218, Para 2, dtd 24 Oct 1974 

Mass SO 238, Para 1, dtd 19 Nov 1974 

Mass SO 5, Para 2, dtd 7 Jan 1975 

Mass SO 81, Para 3, dtd 16 Apr 1975 

Mass SO 91, Para 5, dtd 29 Apr 1975 

Mass SO 115, Para 4, dtd 2 June 1975 



81 



19 



7. Future Plans: 

a. Continuing implementation of all missions 

b. Securing appropriate State Guard insignia, patch and ID cards 

c. Finalization of State Guard History 

d. Finalization of By-Laws of State Guard Social Organization 

e. Continuing planning for Massachusetts NG Museum 

f. Organization of Speaker's Bureau 

g. Planning for a Pistol Team 

h. Preparation of Staff SOP to include HHD Staff Presentations on 
respective roles, missions and responsibilities. 

i. Increasing enlisted strength of 43 Officer and 2 Enlisted to 50 each for 
an objective total of 100 



82 



INSPECTOR GENERAL 



INSPECTIONS 



The Inspector General's Office, the "Eyes and Ears" for The Adjutant 
General, reorganized during Fiscal Year 1975 to conform with the guidelines 
recommended by the Department of the Army. 

This reorganization resulted in establishing a detailed evaluation 
and analyzation of all previous inspection reports to determine potential 
problem areas. Units were provided with timely information to assist im- 
proving unit operation. The results of this were reflected by all units 
inspected during Fiscal Year 1975 receiving satisfactory ratings. 

The Inspector General conducted comprehensive staff studies and in- 
vestigations during 1975 and provided The Adjutant General with impartial 
appraisals regarding the performance of mission and the state of economy, 
efficiency, discipline and morale of the Massachusetts National Guard. In- 
dividuals with personal problems were assisted by the Inspector General's 
Office during the course of the year. 

Unit Fund reports were audited and monitored throughout the year to 
ascertain that the monies appropriated were properly accounted for. 



83 



SAFETY OFFICER 
experience and the pLgrLTof 'safety aeries 'as re^red?^ aCC " ent 

-otiSs «;^ L^rLTste^ mrr^ of - safety — ^^ - p- 

for use by the A™ y National Guard ' publicatlons ™* <>*** media suitable 

National^ Safet^"^™? 1 ™ '" ^"^ Pe " alning t0 the S ^ ^ 
Health te? U fSsSa? U « e,ien ^ < 0£ SeCretar ^ ° f Lab °r »" Occupational Safety and 

charged to JSj , ^ 1 St^cST^1 () S^. , ^^? ,m, I "* 
where ARNG technicians are employed TMssurvy shoulTL° . eS f tablishmen ^ 

quired to co^ect'inco^siste'nclerS ol^Tal^T'^ """^ ">"* ™" 
permit financing of the 1^^,?^^?^^^^^ 

fled in'phasf?! "fi COrrection of inconsistencies with OSHA standards identi- 

sonnel resources as nrFTID r Ma e nd S ""* ^ " "" C ° ndU " ed W " hin listing per- 
purpose Mandays have been programmed in FY 1976 for this 



84 



COMMUNITY ACTION PROGRAMS OF THE MASSACHUSETTS NATIONAL GUARD 



Following is a list of community action projects involving the 
Massachusetts National Guard: 

a. Summer Music Youth Learning Experience (SMYLE) supported by 215th 
Army Band, Fall River, Massachusetts. 

b. Aid to Middleton sanitary land fill fire. 

c. Over 40 water trailers to Taunton and Taunton State Hospital (October 
water supply contaminated) . 

d. Environmental Education Trail Systems for handicapped children (Blue 
Hills), Massachusetts. 

e. Participated in numerous parades and band concerts, not to mention 
the many firing squads and parades that other troops have marched in. 

f. Support of MDC reservations and river clean-up campaigns (three 
weekends) . 

g. Hypertension :md Diabetic Screening Program for Boston Hosptials. 
Over 5,000 local residents were screened. 

h. Assistance in Faulkner Hospital move. 

i. Many blood drives that many Guardsmen have supported. 

j. Support of Phase I and II Busing. 

k. Loan of vests and protection equipment to US Marshals and MDC, State, 
and Boston Police. 

1. Plum Island sandbag wall. Over 800 Guardsmen reported on short notice 
and filled over 1,000 sandbags to erect an eight-foot wall. 

m. Loan of food containers to Walpole Prison, 

n. Horizons for Youth Walk-A-Thon from every armory in the State, 

o. Helped ABCD in their collection of toys at Christmas. 

p. Collection and storage of relief supplies for the Guatemala Earthquake, 

q. Numerous engineering projects by the 101st Engineer Battalion in 
building and repairing ball fields and recreational activities. 



85 



\\ 



r. Air National Guard also participated in many community action 
projects to include mutual aid to local fire departments at Otis Air Force 
Base, Massachusetts. 

s. Sixty (60) Air National Guard people volunteered their time for 
Cerebral Palsy Telethon. 

t. Firing of 105MM Howitzers at the playing of the 1812 Overture 
by the Boston Pops Orchestra at Hatch Memorial Shell. 

u. 215th Armry Band to participate in 4th of July ceremonies at State 
House, Boston, Massachusetts. 

v. Participation by 12 personnel in the Greater Brockton Inter-Hospital 
Emergency Simulated Disaster Exercise scheduled for September 1976. 

w. Completion of a new playground in Northbridge Massachusetts. 

x. Participation by l/211th FA Battalion in the Fort Tabor Historical 
Association Bicentennial Activities (105MM, personnel, etc.). 

y. First Aid Station provided by 114th Medical Battalion, and Water 
Trailers by 182d Infantry for Governor's Jogger's Fair, Boston Common, 19 June 
1976. 

z. Bus provided by 26th Infantry Division to Executive Office of Environ- 
mental Affairs to transport 26 state and federal land and water conservation 
Fund Grant workshop conferees. 

aa. 23 water tailers provided to City of Salem (36" water main break). 

bb. Grading and widening of a pond for recreation purposes and improvement 
of a trail for fire apparatus to Town of Holliston Conservation Commission. 

cc. Bus transportation for 45 Boy Scouts at the request of Congressman 
Early, 3rd District, Massachusetts. 

dd. 20 round gun salute to Haverhill for "Festival 76". 

ee. First aid tent ambulance provided to North Bay Council Boy Scout 
Jamboree. 

ff. Grading of a parking lot for Department of Envirnomental Quality 
Engineering. 

gg. Participation in the Easter Seal Fund Raising Campaign. 

hh. Repair of swimming pool at Camp Sea Haven for Cerebral Palsy of Greater 
Boston. 

ii. Return of gun salute to Swedish Gunship at Provincetown at request of 
Congressman Studds' office. 

jj. Encampment of Camp Edwards by Socialites Drum & Bugle Corps (Air 

National Guard) . 

86 



kk. Return of Cannon to Town of Montague by 1058th Transportation 
Company, 

11. Use of Camp Edwards by Maiden Catholic High School for pre-season 
football camp. 

mm. Loan of Walkie-Talkies to Massachusetts Bicentennial Commission 
for the Knox Trail Bicentennial Celebration. 

nn. 20 round gun salute to Melrose 14-15 August 1976 for Bicentennial 
Activities. 

oo. Bus to transport 40 mentally retarded adults from Brockton Workshop 
Center to Red Sox Baseball game. 

pp. 2 GP Medium tents to Kamp for Kids, Westfield, MA for July and 
August 1976. 

qq. 5 GP Medium tents to US Dept of Labor for two (2) weeks (Day Camp). 

rr. Water trailer to Town of Auburn, MA (Contaminated Water). 

ss. 10 Personnel from C, l-101st Field Artillery to assist City of Lynn 
"Summer in the City "76" Project". 

tt. 1 tent, 60 chains, 8 tables to Danvers State Hospital for day camp 
for two (2) weeks. 

uu. Military Support (Public Safety & Vehicle Traffic Control) 9-11 July 
1976 for visit of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and the Tall Ships Exhibit. 

w. Fighting a burning and smoldering land-fill fire in Middleton, 
Massachusetts by 101st Enginer Battalion. 

ww. Personnel opened armories throughout the State in order to provide 
shelter for civilians during threat of Hurricane "BELLE" 9-10 August 1976. 

xx. On 29 August 1976, Washington, DC, 6 units of the Massachusetts 
Army National Guard received streamers for their colors. These units had 
their heritage traced back to before 1783. Units that received decorations 
were as follows: 

1-182 Infantry Bn - MA ARNG - 26th Inf Div 
1-101 Engr Bn(Cbt) - MA ARNG - 26th Inf Div 
772d MP Co (685th MP Bn) - MA ARNG - 26th Inf Div 
1-104 Inf Bn - MA ARNG - 26th Inf Div 
2-104 Inf Bn - MA ARNG - 26th Inf Div 
126 Sig Bn - MA ARNG - 26th Inf Div 

See Sgt Paul Crehan for pictures. 



87 



In addition, prior to start on NG Convention "A r,-„„,- • „ 

was held on 30 August 1976 A „i „„ ' nt ln Anns Ceremony" 

. Vartanian, The Adjutant General ^l^V™*^ t0 MaJ ° r General v ahan 
Battalion.' As one or he oldLt units ta thfna^ ^ "'I?" ° f 101St E ^ lneer 

- Battalion is also schedule for thif^ard in^he'very ne^r future. ^^ 

Nationli Geltary^^L 6 ^ ^ tllo'lT T^ M "" d " CO °* leX ' * 
10,000 people were in attendance! ' ""^ afternn °°- An estimated 

zz. City of Lowell Regatta Festival 9-11 Octoher 1Q7<; d 
equipment from l/26th Cavalry, 101 Eneineer 1 Tn? ™ ,i I Personnel and 
in parade. HHD, 685th MP and' 9 "d M^Co provide traf ft llm * P"«<*P»'«i 
Battery C, 1/101 Field Artillery provided'^ to 1812 O^erturef """^ 

12-14 October 1976. c ball sbury Beach, Massachusetts, 

and ,$& ^^J^^£^^^ Z; ^ S & r Battalion 

to ™Ts 8 L n ra y g e PO d W e e t ^.EKS T *? "^ A -"-- ---^0^ 
Givil Defense 8 and OfklftTl^UT^T^ "^ "' "*-** ° f 

Band, C l/i8 2 d P 1nf 1 ^ry 1 L ln oL1 U FnsinL a r y L^a!^ ""*' * ^ — 
elderlylufinr^ro^t" 6 " * TaUnt ° n *"«*«•«« for residents in an 

oi-r^^'^j^oSrssr - traffic contro1 to **• *«• 

for Ca^;ree a co e nduc r ted le i5-17 N 0°c r to h he B r y i976? Cil ** ^^ Peabody ' ^achusetts 

ggg. 114th Medical Battalion conducting hypertension and l e »,1 nn < ■ 
screening at Faulkner Hospital, Saturday, 23 October 1976? Poisoning 

Massachtett a :XlToctoLr 1976. COl0ny ** SC ° UtS f ° r C "" " e in D — ^ 
evaded asT^of f^in ^.IT^S?.?* " ^^ 



88 



A WEEKEND TO REMEMBER 



THE TALL SHIPS AND THE ROYAL VISIT 



On the weekend of July 10-11, Bostonlans took part In a series of events 
which will not likely happen again in our lifetime. From out of another era; 
70. of the world's finest sailing ships sailed into Boston Harbor while 650,000 
excited citizens watched. A day later, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth honored the 
city with its first visit by a reigning British monarch to help Boston celebrate 
the nationa's 200th birthday. 

Throughout the weekend, the National Guard was there. More than 800 
Guardsmen provided crucial assistance in security, crowd control, traffic con- 
trol, and medical services. 

Long before the spectators filled pleasure craft, harbor islands, balconies, 
bridges and shorelines, members of the Guard were briefed and ready. At Camp 
Curtis Guild, members of the 685th Military Police Battalion, the 972d Military 
Police Company arid the 26th Military Police Company boarded buses for key lo- 
cations in the pre-dawn darkness to be ready when the throngs arrived. 

In addition to Military Police, members of the State Headquarters were in- 
volved in all aspects of the weekend. The First Brigade provided general coordina- 
tion assistance; the 26th Aviation Battalion provided air support for the Secret 
Service and State Police; the First Battalion, 211th Field Artillery handled 
the complex traffic arrangements at the Boston Army Base as thousands inspected 
the Tall Ships; and the 114th Medical Battalion was on hand for emergency medical 
assistance. 

On Sunday morning, the Guard was ready for the Queen's visit. First, 
services at the Old North Church, then a gracious address by the Queen, televised 
to the nation from the Old State House. The Queen was escorted by an Honor Guard 
of cadets from the Massachusetts Military Academy, the nation's oldest state mili- 
tary school, including the Academy's first female cadets. 

The National Guard Band played a musical interlude while the Queen lunched, 
and several units marched in the spectacular parade which followed. Members 
of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company presented the Queen with a set 
of silver spoons to complement the silver tea service they had presented during 
a 1971 visit to England. 

After a tour of Boston and inspection of Old Ironsides, the Royal Couple 
departed for Canada. Throughout the day, crowds were jubilant, cheerful, and 
enthusiastic in their approval of their royal visitor. The National Guard can 
be justly proud of its part in making this celebration truly a weekend to 
remember. 

The 65th Public Information Detachment has prepared a slide program called 
"A Weekend to Remember". The program is available for presentation on request. 



89 



M 







STATE MAINTENANCE OFFICE 
BI-ANNUAL REPORT 
1975 - 1976 

MISSION 

No change from previous report. 
PERSONNEL 

shownWoT^ng^ i^T ?' """f* W * S -'horlzed positions as 
manning assigned atV positions l"** ^""f '° 9S P° si "°- with a 
employes „Je been ass^l^^^g^^ s^naf b een 2^7"^ 



FY 75 



Inspection 
Shop Control 
Armament 
Automotive 
Electronics 
Calibration 
SVC Section 
SMO 

Temporary 



TOTAL 



Auth 


On Hand 


14 


13 


11 


10 


9 


9 


31 


31 


10 


9 


3 


3 


12 


12 


5 


5 


95 


92 


9l 


2 
94 



FY 76 



Auth 


On Hand 


16 


13 


11 


10 


8 


7 


27 


24 


11 


10 


3 


3 


14 


12 


5 


5 


95 


84 




2 


95 


86 



intensive recruiting drives. «"»signea unit. This included periodic 

c. School s - Several personnel have attended schools at TT9A ^ i 
^t^.^ntan" 1 ^" ^^ '""* <«» « SA Tant ^it^ no , 

Haust ventiiation s y ste m , eiectricai ^^t^^^.^ elon . 

TRAINING 

a. Personnel - Personnel have attended service schools for ,n„r efl e 

90 



I 
1 

I 
II 

I 
P 



b. Annual General Inspection AGI's conducted in April and December 
1975, ratings of satisfactory were received. 

c. Training Programs A course of instruction of organizational 
maintenance was conducted by tbe CSMS for automotive mechanics reassigned 
to OMSs from the ADA program. In addition camouflage painting instruction 
to OMSs is taking place on a continuing basis. 

COMMUNITY RELATIONS 

Several personnel of the Lowell Vocational Technical School have been 
given tours of the CSMS. Some selected personnel have provided assistance 
in support of civil disturbance operations. 

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY 

Two (2) EEO counselors are assigned to the CSMS. 

AWARDS 

Ceremonies have been conducted throughout the year as required for presentation 
of excellent performance awards, service certificates and blood donor awards. 



91 



ffl 



H 



1 
1 
II 
V 
II 



LSUfTOK 



Ha 






.■I j" :>: 



.£M.